What, if anything, should the legislature do to help Chicago Public Schools?

Education

With thousands of Chicago downtown buildings being undervalued by the Cook County Assessor there is absolutely no justification for requesting additional funding from the overtaxed citizens of the rest of Illinois.

CPS is one area I haven't done much reading. Raising 4 kids in Grayslake, the local schools have had my attention.

Chicago Public Schools should not be treated any differently than any other school district in Illinois. There were certain aspects of the school funding compromise which benefitted CPS at the expense of all other schools, whether they be suburban or downstate schools, and that manipulation of the new formula encourages bad financial decisions. Under no circumstances would I support any bailout of Chicago Public Schools.

Money should follow our students to ensure their education is being funded properly, not prop up failing or poorly-managed schools.

Create several regional boards of education within the city with each board made up of volunteer elected individuals. Use such regional boards to replace the board of education. This program would help to make the regions responsive to the residents of the regions. There should be equity among the regions. I have seen too many instances of students riding CTA buses to schools with more than an hour to get to a school that is suitable. No student should have to travel more than ½ hour to get to or from school.

Given that Chicago receives, I believe, less than 80¢ for every dollar it sends to Springfield. It seems to me that the legislature could provide more financial help to the CPS. Given the large student population, and the large at-risk student population, I don't think this would be unwarranted.

Not living in Chicago, I do not know much about its schools except for what I read in the press, which generally unfortunately is unfavorable. Cut any waste that can be identified and institute an elected school board and invest more in students and maintain and repair buildings.

At first, I thought that it would be widely beneficial for the CPS to have an elected board. However, as I think about it, it may harm the way things are done for CPS. I foresee millions of dollars being contributed to campaigns for the board coming from far and wide - which may not help CPS students in the long run. As of right now, I would need to speak with people connected to CPS before I definitively provide an answer for this question.

At first, I thought that it would be widely beneficial for the CPS to have an elected board. However, as I think about it, it may harm the way things are done for CPS. I foresee millions of dollars being contributed to campaigns for the board coming from far and wide - which may not help CPS students in the long run. As of right now, I would need to speak with people connected to CPS before I definitively provide an answer for this question.

Nothing more than has already been provided.

We need to give teachers better tools to manage and control their classrooms, which would then lead to maintaining greater teacher accountability for the education of their students. Reward teachers for how well they prepare students for the next higher grade.

I don't claim to be an expert on every issue facing Chicago Public Schools, but I do know the kids who attend those schools deserve better opportunities and better schools than many are getting. I will work with all sides, administrators, Chicago Teachers Union, IEA, AFT, reform advocates, Republicans and Democrats to help find consensus on what it takes to make all schools in Illinois good for all kids in Illinois.

My experience as a parent and my faith leads me to want every child in our state to get a great education so they have a chance to benefit from the wonderful opportunities available in our country. The Chicago Public Schools have failed so many. They continue to spend more and more money and get diminished returns. As history has demonstrated, sending more money to Chicago will only ensure the failed system will persist; it only treats the symptom, not the cause. Local officials in Chicago, from the Mayor on down have destroyed the City's property tax base as a whole to benefit the few through TIF district and other policies. They need to be forced to rethink those policies to improve their ability to fund cities locally.

I am sure that there are a lot more things that could be done of which I am currently unaware. Given a choice, I would assemble the best people in the state who are more familiar with this complicated issue and have them propose a long term strategy and suggestions. Success leaves clues, but so does failure. We need to identify the most successful programs in the country and follow their lead.

The Chicago Tribune has reported on the many abuses that take place at CPS. Thousands of dollars in gift cards intended to help students were stolen by CPS staff members. Why is it the responsibility of taxpayers throughout Illinois to bail out a corrupt and ineffective school system? CPS needs to get its house in order before taxpayers send more of their money to this problematic school system

Coming rom northwest Illinois I feel our schools need the help not CPS. They seem to be able to do what ever they want

The legislature should insist that the city of Chicago's property values are properly assessed so that there is enough tax revenue generated to pay for their schools and teacher retirement plans.

We should provide greater opportunities of school choice and charter schools. Competition is what this country is founded on and education should not be ignored.

The best thing for the legislature to do to help the Chicago Public Schools is to allow them to solve their own problems. Property taxes are already increasing in Chicago and eventually the taxpayers in Chicago will call for accountability. An infusion of state government funds once again papers over the long term problems.

Whether it's Chicago Public Schools or any other individual school district, the legislature should never make policy decisions that benefit one particular school over another. For too long, Springfield politicians have manipulated education policy to give Chicago Public Schools special deals and additional funding that no other Illinois school district receives. Even though the school funding reform compromise made many positive changes to education policy, it still includes certain provisions that benefit CPS over all other school districts. While CPS may be a struggling school district, there are many struggling school districts across the state, and CPS's special status in the Democratic-controlled General Assembly has forced taxpayers to divert resources from their own local schools to Chicago.

Simply hold it accountable, stop passing legislation that bails it out.

The legislature needs to close a loophole left in the 2010 education reform. The law mandated teacher evaluations but failed to insist on impartial evaluators. The mandate in its current condition offers little to improve our schools. (It is like our toothless water-quality law that mandates notice within 24 hours of a violation but defines violation in a manner that would allow tainted water to go unreported for six months or even nine years depending on the service area.)

Here, the entity that trains the evaluators shows how easy it is for the teacher evaluators to do this important work without having undergone the training themselves: "There is an expectation in the Illinois School Code of the honesty and integrity of all individuals who take the assessments who are certificated or soon to be certificated in Illinois. When an individual is found to have violated a condition of testing with the intent of falsifying his or her identity or unfairly affecting his or her performance in the current or a future test administration, the violation shall be taken as evidence that the individual is not of good character as required by Section 21-1 of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/21-1]. This means that violating any condition of testing would result in loss of qualification as an evaluator and/or educational certification in Illinois. Evaluators will be required to validate their identity and that that they understand and comply with the rules for assessment security each time they take a training program or assessment." -Illinois Performance Evaluation Growth Through Learning FAQ April 12 2012

That bit does not even touch on impartiality. At the outset, the structures in place for evaluation do not even assure us that the evaluators are qualified. We need to identify the teachers who are not providing education at the premium level we must expect for our community. They must receive supportive training or move to positions that meet their skills while keeping them active in the school system.

We need to enact serious reforms to the way TIF districts are created and direct more of the funds they collect to the CPS system. The over 100 TIF districts in the City of Chicago are siphoning away millions of dollars from CPS. The guidelines establishing the duration and scope of TIF districts needs to be more stringent, and I would be opening to supporting legislation in Springfield that offered some iteration of these reforms.

Once the Chicago Public School system proves that the education they provide is results driven they can begin asking the hardworking taxpayers for more support.

CPS needs accountability to the state so we don't continue to spend money on approaches that don't work.

We need to hold them accountable. CPS needs to perform better before taxpayers pay more of their hard-earned money to bail them out.

Increase funding

The increased money that CPS is receiving is absolutely necessary for the fiscal health of CPS. However, I strongly disagree with the new back door voucher scheme that is tied to the formula, and believe that it is both unconstitutional and a serious threat to public school funding now and in the future. I believe the legislature should eliminate that component of the new funding structure. Additionally, the legislature should pass legislation that creates an elected school board so CPS is steered from within the community.

SB1 and 1947, provide additional State funding to CPS as well as share in funding of pensions as we do for other school districts. It also allows for Chicago to have other tools to address the pension's underfunding. With this additional State assistance, Mayor Emanual should have the ability to address CPS problems. I am however open to discussing other ways to assist CPS.

Ensure funding is proportional to the resources necessary to teach the students adequately and not allow the funding to become diluted by increased enrollment from students who might transfer into the Chicago Public Schools after the funding has been set. Further, I think if funding were more readily and efficiently handled we could have teachers who worry less about their unions and more about providing the students with a proper education. The legislature should verify the funds actually go where they are needed.

The legislature needs to allocate more money to all public schools. Many states pay a much higher percentage of public school budgets. As more state funding becomes available for public schools, the need to have high property taxes lessons and reduced property taxes encourages more residents, especially those on a fixed income to remain in their homes and in the state.

The legislature should pay a share of CPS pensions just as it does for every other school district in the state.

Since many CPS schools are in high-poverty areas, the new funding formula should help reduce the funding gap they currently experience. Every effort should be made to increase the timetable to fully fund the formula to help the schools. The school board also needs to be more accountable to Chicago taxpayers. To accomplish this, I support an elected school board.

The last school funding bill went a long way towards doing what the State should do to solve the CPS problems. It will not solve them all, since just like with our State, the City of Chicago had woefully underfunded their pensions as well creating a huge fiscal problem for CPS. Therefore, the first thing that the legislature should do for CPS is to continue funding schools in the general manner that they just did in the most recent funding bill. I will strongly support the continuation of more funding from the state and less from property taxes.

I am against the concept of tenure in our schools, as I believe that if a teacher is not performing well that it can have a chilling effect on our children. All it takes is one math teacher who is no longer engaged for some reason, and many children in that class will get left behind and never be able to catch up. I do not think that the charter school program should be expanded at this time. While there are many excellent ones, the failing ones need to be closed down, as do the failing public schools. Providing a first rate education to ALL of our children is absolutely essential to our continued progress, as it benefits all of us when talents that might not otherwise be nurtured are given the encouragement and tools to flourish. In fact, I believe that giving every child an equal chance at success is morally necessary in a free-market system .

Teachers are of course the foundation of our education system and they must be supported in every way that helps them produce graduates that have the skills to contribute in our modern technological economy. We are not getting the job done right now. Compared to the rest of the world US students are not faring very impressively and their math skills are particularly poor. Reading and math skills are paramount and non-negotiable, but other scientific and technological skills must be honed as well. In the last few years many new state laws have passed concerning teacher licensing and accreditation, and for the most part these laws have loosened the requirements for licensing. I feel strongly that this is the wrong direction for us to be traveling.

I am instead for increased licensing requirements and more rigorous education in general for future teachers. (However, I am not talking about new requirements that would eliminate present teachers). I want teachers to possess an education and an expertise that will make them the envy of our society, so that all parents and students will respect them and take education seriously. I am also for less spending on sports and extracurricular activities as I believe that we need to make it more clear to our children that the purpose of school is education.

We need to continue to work together on bipartisan solutions and use new sources of revenue to aid Chicago Public Schools. We must agree on new policies that will help our students without further increasing taxes on those who can't afford it.

If anything, Illinois should demand academic performance and cost performance standards. Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and downstate school funding problems start with depopulation. Addressing the job losses and depopulation will help all school districts in our state. CPS students deserve a quality education just like everyone else in this state, but CPS must be accountable and must be better stewards of the taxpayers' money.

The GA should handle the Chicago public school pension system in the same way it handles all other school pension systems. Local voters need to hold Chicago elected officials accountable.

They should function like the rest of the state (except in statistically proven poverty areas) and fund their own schools.

If anything, Illinois should demand academic performance and cost performance standards. Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and downstate school funding problems start with depopulation. Addressing the job losses and depopulation will help all school districts in our state. CPS students deserve a quality education just like everyone else in this state, but CPS must be accountable and must be better stewards of the taxpayers' money.

The GA should handle the Chicago public school pension system in the same way it handles all other school pension systems. Local voters need to hold Chicago elected officials accountable.

They should function like the rest of the state (except in statistically proven poverty areas) and fund their own schools.

Again, my belief, which will not impact my vote on the Senate floor, I will vote for my people. Having said that its a shame the way the Chicago school system is run. I think it is due to the corruption of Madigan and his political thugs. They do not serve the people in both houses, they are destroying the people in both houses.

We need to increase our commitment to education and training for all people so that young people can get more skilled jobs and older people can be trained in new fields. We need to embrace alternative technologies for energy production, develop new electronic and biological technologies and invest in our infrastructure as other countries are doing.

We need to increase our commitment to education and training for all people so that young people can get more skilled jobs and older people can be trained in new fields. We need to embrace alternative technologies for energy production, develop new electronic and biological technologies and invest in our infrastructure as other countries are doing.

The most important thing the legislature can do to improve Chicago Public Schools is to bring accountability to the school board by making it an elected, representative body accountable to the people. I also believe that the State needs to live up to the constitutional mandate to be the primary funder of public schools. We are second to last in State funding of our schools, and that means we get highly inequitable education and an overreliance on property taxes. Last, I would like to develop a school-to-work apprenticeship program so that students in my district have an incentive to stay in school and have a path to a good job when they graduate.

Illinois must spend more on schools, not just in Chicago, but across the state. In recent years, Illinois has ranked 50th of the 50 states in the percentage of K-12 public school funding provided by the state, contributing less than 20%, while the national average for states is 45%. As a result, school districts have relied on property tax payers to make up the difference, which contributes to inequity between poor and rich districts. In the longer term, this funding should come primarily from a progressive income tax. Because that will require a Constitutional amendment, we also need more readily available funding sources in the short term, such as the revenue sources I detailed in a previous question. The state legislature should also pass legislation to allow TIF resources to be used to finance local public schools. This would allow the City of Chicago to use TIF surplus to make greater investments into the Chicago Public School system.

The recently passed funding bill helped CPS by providing approximately $300 million in additional funding for teacher pensions and general funding but that won't fix all of the budget problems at CPS. I think it's fair to say Illinois should do more to fund education across the board -- not just at CPS but around the state.

We should not have to pay for our teacher's pensions and the State's, so the pension pick up provision should be included.

The most important thing the legislature can do to improve Chicago Public Schools is to bring accountability to the school board by making it an elected, representative body accountable to the people. I also believe that the State needs to live up to the constitutional mandate to be the primary funder of public schools. We are second to last in State funding of our schools, and that means we get highly inequitable education and an overreliance on property taxes. Last, I would like to develop a school-to-work apprenticeship program so that students in my district have an incentive to stay in school and have a path to a good job when they graduate.

Illinois must spend more on schools, not just in Chicago, but across the state. In recent years, Illinois has ranked 50th of the 50 states in the percentage of K-12 public school funding provided by the state, contributing less than 20%, while the national average for states is 45%. As a result, school districts have relied on property tax payers to make up the difference, which contributes to inequity between poor and rich districts. In the longer term, this funding should come primarily from a progressive income tax. Because that will require a Constitutional amendment, we also need more readily available funding sources in the short term, such as the revenue sources I detailed in a previous question. The state legislature should also pass legislation to allow TIF resources to be used to finance local public schools. This would allow the City of Chicago to use TIF surplus to make greater investments into the Chicago Public School system.

The recently passed funding bill helped CPS by providing approximately $300 million in additional funding for teacher pensions and general funding but that won't fix all of the budget problems at CPS. I think it's fair to say Illinois should do more to fund education across the board -- not just at CPS but around the state.

We should not have to pay for our teacher's pensions and the State's, so the pension pick up provision should be included.

The state should not demand double-paying of pension bills from Chicago tax payers, the state should increase state funding for all schools, and also fund CPS equitably based on the percentage of low-income and vulnerable students CPS serves.

CPS needs to be funded adequately. We receive some of the lowest per student allotments and many of our students are in need of additional resources to thrive. We need equitable programs and services for special education students. Additionally, funding early childhood development programs and pre-schools will help children to arrive in CPS with the skills they need to be successful. Lastly, after-school, library and park district programs will further enrich a student's ability to achieve, and that funding needs to be examined closely.

I would fight for increased CPS funding and for an elected school board.

We should change the curriculum form students.

Provide them with an amount of money that reflects the enormity of their task. I work closely with my neighborhood public schools, and I can say without hesitation that the biggest issue they face is lack of funding. There are few music programs, barebones sports, and few to no other extra-curricular activities. Basic things other districts take for granted are an unheard-of luxury in CPS. We have a school designated as a "technology academy" without a single tech teacher in our neighborhood. We have schools without libraries or librarians, school social workers serving incredibly high need communities with impossibly high caseloads and students learning in buildings with huge structural needs. The kids with the highest levels of need are given the lowest levels of resources, and then publicly shamed for performing poorly. What do we expect, when we give them virtually nothing and expect everything? We have shirked our duty to provide adequate school funding across Illinois, instead letting it fall to property tax levies. This must change.

There are two things that the state government can do to help Chicago Public Schools. The Chicago Public Schools have about 20% of the K-12 public school population and yet it only receives 15% of the state funding. I think every school district including CPS receive proportional funding to the number of pupils they have enrolled. The second problem is the fact that Chicago Public Schools is the only school district in the state that doesn't receive state help in paying the normal costs of its teacher pensions and health care costs for retired teachers. In other words, taxpayers in Chicago not only help pay for CPS pensions but also for school pensions in the rest of the state. In the rest of the state taxpayers help pay for school pensions for every district except CPS. I think it makes sense for Chicago Public Schools to be treated the same way as every other school district in the state as far as pension funding.

There are two things that the state government can do to help Chicago Public Schools. The Chicago Public Schools have about 20% of the K-12 public school population and yet it only receives 15% of the state funding. I think every school district including CPS receive proportional funding to the number of pupils they have enrolled. The second problem is the fact that Chicago Public Schools is the only school district in the state that doesn't receive state help in paying the normal costs of its teacher pensions and health care costs for retired teachers. In other words, taxpayers in Chicago not only help pay for CPS pensions but also for school pensions in the rest of the state. In the rest of the state taxpayers help pay for school pensions for every district except CPS. I think it makes sense for Chicago Public Schools to be treated the same way as every other school district in the state as far as pension funding.

For starters, the legislature should pay the Chicago Public School system the monies they're owed so CPS can stop raising their share of the tax levy, resulting in yet another tax increase on the citizens of Chicago. That is the best way the GA can help CPS right now.

CPS deserves to be fully funded like any other school district. The governor and Mayor have both played too many games with CPS and the kids are the ones who suffer.

Illinois has long had unequal school funding due to its heavy reliance on local property taxes. Unless that system is addressed, CPS schools as well as schools in lower income towns will continue to struggle.

For starters, the legislature should pay the Chicago Public School system the monies they're owed so CPS can stop raising their share of the tax levy, resulting in yet another tax increase on the citizens of Chicago. That is the best way the GA can help CPS right now.

Increase funding

The legislature should work to fully fund Chicago Public Schools. It should recognize given the unique characteristics of the size of the district as well as the issues many students face requires some focused attention and significant resources. CPS has 371,382 students and 77.7% are economically disadvantaged students, 18% are English Language Learners and 13.7% have IEPs. It takes commitment to fully funding the schools and providing paraprofessionals, social workers, librarians, nurses, etc. to assist teachers and administration.

Legislation that would promote an elected school board Also, the legislature should allow CPS the authority to raise property tax levy above the state cap.

Pass a balanced budget. Work on lowering Worker's Compensation premiums.

I believe in having a school board that is accountable to parents and the community, and would like to see the legislature pass a bill that creates an elected school board for the Chicago Public Schools. Illinois still largely relies on property taxes to fund public education, creating large disparities between wealthy school districts such as Winnetka, and the least wealthy school districts such as those in the south suburbs. We must continue to move towards having more equitable resources to support our schools.

The legislature should do everything in its power to ensure all our public schools are fully funded and thriving, which includes Chicago Public Schools.

The legislature should take actions to make public schools as safe and orderly as possible. CPS and all school districts schools should be transparent in its business practices and publicly accountable. The legislature should support legislation that requires openness and accountability. This would help schools in how they function as well as how they are perceived by the public. Many parents have little confidence in CPS.

To be honest, I don't know. I suspect this question is aimed at what financial help the legislature should give to Chicago Public Schools. I need to do more study to be able to answer this question properly. I would support legislation that provided for an elected school board. While I understand the desire of Chicago mayors to have control over the schools, the Chicago school board has turned a deaf ear to voices from the community when making important decisions that affect those communities. They need to bring stakeholders to the table and not just at the point of making decisions, but throughout the year.
The learning challenges faced by poor children of color in Chicago stem from multiple sources, including violence in their communities, high incarceration rates, lack of employment for their parents, inadequate access to fresh food, and a patchwork of medical care. Many children have direct experience of trauma that affects their ability to concentrate in school. The state should do whatever it can to address the root causes of children's ability to learn and to build supportive services that will help these children break the current cycle of poverty that grips them.

I don't think the legislature should show favoritism to any school, and should treat every child equally. Every single child in the State of Illinois should have access to a quality education, regardless of where they live or where they were born. First and foremost, we have to fund schools properly through the State of Illinois so school districts don't have to rely so heavily on local property taxes to fund the basic service of education.

Chicago Public Schools along with downstate schools are underfunded. We do not have equity in our public education system, and we need to work towards equity for all our children. Our schools are mostly funded by property taxes and the disproportionate amount of money going into schools causes drastic opportunity differences for our children. We have to change the formula away from the majority of funds coming from property taxes.

The legislature should ensure the Chicago Public School system is controlled by an elected school board and fund a budget that is transparent, accountable, and meets the needs. The legislature must stop ignoring the millions of dollars diverted into non-education related programs, and create an oversight committee that is able to catch the wrongdoings instead of waiting 4 years for the Federal Government to step in and stop the corruption. By creating transparent financial reporting, citizens AND lawmakers can see where the money is going, if it has impact, and what changes need to be made.

Chicago Public Schools will most benefit when the states finally starts living up to its constitutionally mandated responsibility and adequately funds our schools. At the macro level, the inadequacy of state funding hamstrings our most under-resourced schools, many of which are in CPS. Limiting the volume of unfunded mandates would also benefit CPS significantly. As a local school board leader I know that many of these mandates, while well-intentioned, are difficult, if not impossible, to implement unless they have some technical assistance/funding associated with them. Finally, attacks on adequate federal funding for special needs students will disproportionately impact CPS because of the strains for such a large district to supplement or replace this funding when reduced. I believe the Illinois state legislature needs to closely focus on the impacts of the changes to federal education funding and in particular mitigate any adverse impacts on the most vulnerable and marginalized students and families.

To be honest, I don't know. I suspect this question is aimed at what financial help the legislature should give to Chicago Public Schools. I need to do more study to be able to answer this question properly. I would support legislation that provided for an elected school board. While I understand the desire of Chicago mayors to have control over the schools, the Chicago school board has turned a deaf ear to voices from the community when making important decisions that affect those communities. They need to bring stakeholders to the table and not just at the point of making decisions, but throughout the year.
The learning challenges faced by poor children of color in Chicago stem from multiple sources, including violence in their communities, high incarceration rates, lack of employment for their parents, inadequate access to fresh food, and a patchwork of medical care. Many children have direct experience of trauma that affects their ability to concentrate in school. The state should do whatever it can to address the root causes of children's ability to learn and to build supportive services that will help these children break the current cycle of poverty that grips them.

I don't think the legislature should show favoritism to any school, and should treat every child equally. Every single child in the State of Illinois should have access to a quality education, regardless of where they live or where they were born. First and foremost, we have to fund schools properly through the State of Illinois so school districts don't have to rely so heavily on local property taxes to fund the basic service of education.

Chicago Public Schools along with downstate schools are underfunded. We do not have equity in our public education system, and we need to work towards equity for all our children. Our schools are mostly funded by property taxes and the disproportionate amount of money going into schools causes drastic opportunity differences for our children. We have to change the formula away from the majority of funds coming from property taxes.

The legislature should ensure the Chicago Public School system is controlled by an elected school board and fund a budget that is transparent, accountable, and meets the needs. The legislature must stop ignoring the millions of dollars diverted into non-education related programs, and create an oversight committee that is able to catch the wrongdoings instead of waiting 4 years for the Federal Government to step in and stop the corruption. By creating transparent financial reporting, citizens AND lawmakers can see where the money is going, if it has impact, and what changes need to be made.

Chicago Public Schools will most benefit when the states finally starts living up to its constitutionally mandated responsibility and adequately funds our schools. At the macro level, the inadequacy of state funding hamstrings our most under-resourced schools, many of which are in CPS. Limiting the volume of unfunded mandates would also benefit CPS significantly. As a local school board leader I know that many of these mandates, while well-intentioned, are difficult, if not impossible, to implement unless they have some technical assistance/funding associated with them. Finally, attacks on adequate federal funding for special needs students will disproportionately impact CPS because of the strains for such a large district to supplement or replace this funding when reduced. I believe the Illinois state legislature needs to closely focus on the impacts of the changes to federal education funding and in particular mitigate any adverse impacts on the most vulnerable and marginalized students and families.

Of course we need to do what we can to help our public schools and that includes Chicago Public Schools. But the frustrating thing as that no matter how much money you throw at CPS, it seems to be wasted and mismanaged.

We should pass my bill that would provide for an Elected Representative School Board for CPS. CPS has been plagued by many many problems over the course of the last 20 years. However, many of those problems were brought about by decisions that a publicly elected body would have a hard time justifying to voters. The Chicago Teacher's Pension Fund was fully funded. After the Mayor took control of the board, CPS skipped pension payments for a decade and that is not the single biggest financial problem that CPS faces. The hiring and firing of so many questionable heads of CPS (Bennet and Claypool) only happened because the board did not have any accountability to the taxpayers who foot the bill. An elected school board will not solve all of the problems at CPS, but it will finally put the fate and future of CPS into the hands of those responsible for it. The taxpayers.

We should pass my bill that would provide for an Elected Representative School Board for CPS. CPS has been plagued by many many problems over the course of the last 20 years. However, many of those problems were brought about by decisions that a publicly elected body would have a hard time justifying to voters. The Chicago Teacher's Pension Fund was fully funded. After the Mayor took control of the board, CPS skipped pension payments for a decade and that is not the single biggest financial problem that CPS faces. The hiring and firing of so many questionable heads of CPS (Bennet and Claypool) only happened because the board did not have any accountability to the taxpayers who foot the bill. An elected school board will not solve all of the problems at CPS, but it will finally put the fate and future of CPS into the hands of those responsible for it. The taxpayers.

Of course we need to do what we can to help our public schools and that includes Chicago Public Schools. But the frustrating thing as that no matter how much money you throw at CPS, it seems to be wasted and mismanaged.

Eliminate corruption. Get rid of poorly performing employees in the system. Improve quality of education for our children by allowing for more private school competition.

The legislature should always consider children's education one of our top priorities.But, CPS should not be getting more state funds than the rest of the children in other communities.

I do not believe that Chicago Public Schools should receive any special consideration or assistance that is not also available to all other Illinois school districts. I also do not believe that CPS should have the ability to turn to Illinois taxpayers outside of Chicago for a bailout due to a financial crisis of their own making. A series of patchwork rules and special deals in many policy areas have led to our state's financial decline, and further special assistance to CPS would only encourage more bad decision-making.

I do not believe that Chicago Public Schools should receive any special consideration or assistance that is not also available to all other Illinois school districts. I also do not believe that CPS should have the ability to turn to Illinois taxpayers outside of Chicago for a bailout due to a financial crisis of their own making. A series of patchwork rules and special deals in many policy areas have led to our state's financial decline, and further special assistance to CPS would only encourage more bad decision-making.

The CPS is a difficult situation. I have been a teacher in my life experience and I sympathize a great del with students, parent, teachers, and even principals in this system that has largely failed in it's mission to prepare school children for the society they will enter. We need to look at every opportunity we can to still give parents an opportunity and strong choices to send their children into a safe and effective environment. I want the system to succeed.

Eliminate corruption. Get rid of poorly performing employees in the system. Improve quality of education for our children by allowing for more private school competition.

The legislature should always consider children's education one of our top priorities.But, CPS should not be getting more state funds than the rest of the children in other communities.

The state has done more than enough to help Chicago Public Schools. At this point, CPS needs to fix its pension system and it should not continue to receive state funds to cover pension shortfalls as a result of its own mismanagement. CPS may benefit from an elected, rather than appointed, school board.

The CPS is a difficult situation. I have been a teacher in my life experience and I sympathize a great del with students, parent, teachers, and even principals in this system that has largely failed in it's mission to prepare school children for the society they will enter. We need to look at every opportunity we can to still give parents an opportunity and strong choices to send their children into a safe and effective environment. I want the system to succeed.

The state has done more than enough to help Chicago Public Schools. At this point, CPS needs to fix its pension system and it should not continue to receive state funds to cover pension shortfalls as a result of its own mismanagement. CPS may benefit from an elected, rather than appointed, school board.

Our current education system is funded primarily by property taxes. Unfortunately for the Chicago Public Schools, the city of Chicago and Cook County are not paying the appropriate amount of property taxes to fund their schools. Several properties in the City of Chicago are under assessed. For instance, Willis Tower was recently sold for $1.5 billion, but is assessed for less than half that - $550 million. So CPS is being cut short what they should be receiving from all of these under assessed properties and TIF districts. To add insult to injury, the rest of the taxpayers around the state have to pick up the tab, even though we are paying some of the highest property taxes in the nation. One of the first pieces of legislation I will propose will be to reform how property taxes are assessed.

I believe that CPS did well from the evidence based model passed in the SB 1947. Their grant will ensure the city receives more than adequate funding for education.

Our current education system is funded primarily by property taxes. Unfortunately for the Chicago Public Schools, the city of Chicago and Cook County are not paying the appropriate amount of property taxes to fund their schools. Several properties in the City of Chicago are under assessed. For instance, Willis Tower was recently sold for $1.5 billion, but is assessed for less than half that - $550 million. So CPS is being cut short what they should be receiving from all of these under assessed properties and TIF districts. To add insult to injury, the rest of the taxpayers around the state have to pick up the tab, even though we are paying some of the highest property taxes in the nation. One of the first pieces of legislation I will propose will be to reform how property taxes are assessed.

Chicago Public Schools ought not be treated any specially or differently from other public schools. Besides, CPS got more in the education bill that the governor recently signed.

The Legislature should assist the Chicago Public Schools in their ongoing challenges that include documentation of their increased outcomes related to graduation; Creating more parity in the distribution of dollars to all schools, and certainly assistance related to pension reform.

The Legislature should assist the Chicago Public Schools in their ongoing challenges that include documentation of their increased outcomes related to graduation; Creating more parity in the distribution of dollars to all schools, and certainly assistance related to pension reform.

Chicago has the largest tax base in the state and the legislature should let Chicago manage its school finances. The problems in the suburbs are more severe in that there is not the tax base available in Chicago.

Chicago has the largest tax base in the state and the legislature should let Chicago manage its school finances. The problems in the suburbs are more severe in that there is not the tax base available in Chicago.

The legislature took a tremendous step in adding the Chicago Block Grant to CPS' base funding. Now, the legislature should help eliminate CPS unfunded pension liability. It ensures the calculation of adequacy is the same for all districts.

Chicago Public Schools ought not be treated any specially or differently from other public schools. Besides, CPS got more in the education bill that the governor recently signed.

The legislature took a tremendous step in adding the Chicago Block Grant to CPS' base funding. Now, the legislature should help eliminate CPS unfunded pension liability. It ensures the calculation of adequacy is the same for all districts.

As a State Representative I will be concerned with helping the children in schools across Illinois, including in the Chicago Public Schools. The state is Constitutionally required to be the primary funder of education, a requirement it has failed to live up to. Forcing the state to fulfill its constitutional duty will provide immediate property tax relief for communities like mine while ensuring that schools in communities like Chicago, where local elected officials have destroyed the home values and decimated the businesses of their neighborhoods, are adequately funding. The best solution is to rethink how we fund and provide K-12 education and ensure that our schools are accountable to parents and students.

As a State Representative I will be concerned with helping the children in schools across Illinois, including in the Chicago Public Schools. The state is Constitutionally required to be the primary funder of education, a requirement it has failed to live up to. Forcing the state to fulfill its constitutional duty will provide immediate property tax relief for communities like mine while ensuring that schools in communities like Chicago, where local elected officials have destroyed the home values and decimated the businesses of their neighborhoods, are adequately funding. The best solution is to rethink how we fund and provide K-12 education and ensure that our schools are accountable to parents and students.

Leave that bill alone.

I think the funding reform bill went a long way toward stabilizing Chicago Public Schools. CPS has seen noticeable improvement over the last five years, and that funding should help the school system continue those improvements.