What should Illinois do to promote job creation?

Jobs & Economy

Over spending and over borrowing are a trademark for the state of Illinois and until this is brought under control jobs and residents will continue to flee Illinois. Mike Madigan and John Cullerton, who have spent 86 years in Springfield, have assisted the Unions of Illinois in gaining almost complete control of the budgeting process in Illinois and the citizens of Illinois have allowed this to happen. I will support strike prohibitions for most government employees; place limits on the subjects that can be negotiated; fix the workmen's compensation system and place limits on contract length and most importantly — worker freedom provisions.

Illinois should be a place where businesses want to start, grow and thrive and I think reforming property taxes is the most pressing concern for small businesses

Other than lower the tax burden, as previously mentioned, Illinois should reduce regulations on small businesses and entrepreneurs. It should be easier to form and operate a business. That means less red tape and lower costs associated with running a business. One of the biggest costs associated with running a business is worker's compensation insurance. Illinois has some of the highest work. comp. rates in the nation, and businesses and units of government, large and small, often cite it as a large cost. Those regulations should be brought in line with our neighboring states, but also be kept at a level that could adequately compensate injured and disabled workers. That particular reform can make Illinois competitive while also saving taxpayer money at every level of government.

The Illinois legislature needs to make the state more business friendly by getting out of the way of business. Many legislators like my opponent Michelle Mussman think that small businesses need the government to create programs to help them grow. In reality, small businesses need the government to stop over-taxing and over-regulating them and to get out of the way of growth. Significant reforms are needed to worker's compensation and prevailing wage laws to free our small businesses so that they can continue to provide the 50% of jobs in our state.

In my earlier answer about revenue sources, I proposed the creation of a state health care insurance company, a state bank, and a state financial services agency. These would require employees which has a positive job-creation impact. But in addition, being able to make interest rates on borrowed money less than they are likely to be in private versions of these same organizations, industry would be encouraged by the lower cost of money so that they would choose to locate here and create opportunities for new employees.

Clearly, we want to attract companies that will provide good jobs to Illinois. We do that by creating a strong business climate: invest in infrastructure - roads, bridges, internet, communications, and most importantly, people. We need to reverse the trend of disinvesting in education, so that we have a workforce that will attract those good jobs.

Illinois has a large department that is charged with job creation and retention, the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. Chambers of Commerce and business development organizations and incubator centers also aid in job creation. Municipalities also generally have economic development programs. However, nearby states spending per capita, for the most part is reportedly higher than Illinois. Past per capita spending reports were $7990 in Wisconsin, $7030 in Iowa, $6964 in Kentucky, $6528 in Minnesota, $5364 in Michigan, and $4437 in Indiana, the only nearby state that spends less that Illinois at $4947.

Unfortunately, the state was not able to replace the hundreds of thousands of jobs in lost during the last recession, and current trends are not hopeful. The large state deficit worsens the state's economy. Small businesses create the bulk of jobs in the country. Local businesses circulate money throughout the local economy. Larger businesses can move local dollars to other states, and even countries. The state must support entrepreneurship and remove hurdles to business without sacrificing important common-sense regulations. Public/private partnerships should be encouraged and increased. Tax policies should be examined so as to provide some type of support to small businesses and start-ups. The state's business climate and cost of doing business must be improved and business owners assisted with onerous hurdles. Appropriate incentives and tax credits should be utilized so as to attract and retain business.

Additional gaming and new sources of revenue (as previously described herein) should be explored. Closing corporate loopholes, as appropriate should be explored as a revenue source as well. Illinois' economy is under-performing and unemployment is unacceptably high, particularly with regard to states that have better recovered from the last recession. The state's manufacturing base has eroded and the exodus of these jobs has been catastrophic for some communities. While cutting spending has been suggested by some policymakers, some respected economists caution that private sector jobs could suffer as a result. If spending cuts are achieved by reducing the public sector workforce, less money would circulate throughout the local economy from a reduction in consumer spending, which makes up the preponderance of economic activity.

Illinois needs to create jobs to keep pace with growth in its labor force. However, the state's economic performance has for some time lagged seriously behind other states. Reportedly, Illinois has been one of the lowest taxed and spending states for years, and it doesn't seem possible to grow its private sector economy or solve its fiscal problems without looking to at least moderately increasing taxes. I realize that his is a politically unpopular stance and is in part why this hasn't been done until the last budget modest tax increase. However, whatever Illinois has been doing heretofore is not working to ignite its economic engine and drastic approaches need to be scrutinized and if appropriate, implemented. I will not be afraid to look at all proposals to create job growth in this state so as to make this state attractive to business and residents again.

Provide tax incentives for corporations and small business owners - especially if they are willing to plant themselves in diverse districts. Incubators throughout the State for entrepreneurs. Which may mean that the State coordinates with County and Local officials to provide grants for these incubators.

Provide tax incentives for corporations and small business owners - especially if they are willing to plant themselves in diverse districts. Incubators throughout the State for entrepreneurs. Which may mean that the State coordinates with County and Local officials to provide grants for these incubators.

Reduce business taxes and regulations. Reform workers' compensation by reducing medical reimbursement payments.

A great first step would be to designate Illinois as a Right-to-Work State. We also need to take steps to curb pensions plans and re-negotiate worker compensation rules with the productivity of business in mind. This will improve our business climate and create a friendlier environment for business growth.

I agree with Governor Rauner's call to freeze property taxes. I also believe in incentivizing job creation and helping lure business into the state through opportunity for growth, but without corporate welfare. It's also going to take an effort to "sell" the value of Illinois, instead of politicians trashing the state because of what one party or one Governor has done. We all love our state, so we should act like it.

Illinois is losing jobs because it is an unfriendly place to do business. We need to signal to business owners and investors that we value them. We should do this by enacting all of the reforms discussed above. In Burr Ridge, we value business owners who provide jobs and services for members of our community. Since I became mayor we have increased the number of thriving businesses by approximately 10%. One of the ways that we have done is by creating a more pro-business environment that is more welcoming than in the past, knowing that is what would help us preserve our quality of life in our "very special place."

We need business reforms such as lawsuit reform and workers' compensation reform. We need to roll back business regulations and help ± not hurt — the natural industries in Illinois. Most importantly, though, we need some common sense.

An example of the insanity in Illinois is what happened in Grayville. The City of Grayville was promised a prison, but Rod Blagojevich plugged the plug on the project. The city of Grayville spent money laying the ground work for the project to begin but it was all for naught because the state decided not to build the prison. Grayville at one time had a business interested in locating on the site where the prison was to be built. All that was needed was a land conveyance to give the land to the developer. In the end, the state refused to give the land conveyance and the deal fell through. It is insanity like this that is killing our state. Grayville could have had an additional 400 if the state had allowed the deal to go through.

Illinois need s to lower property tax and control workers compensation costs to employers.

Worker's compensation rules critically need reformed to make Illinois more competitive with neighboring states and tort reform should most definitely be addressed. Our debts need to be paid and the state budget must be balanced. Companies that are currently located in this state and potential businesses looking to invest here need reassurance that they will not be stuck with the burdens of our corrupt career politicians' mistakes.

We need to start by reducing the property tax burden, rolling back the recent tax hike, improve our worker's compensation system, reduce burdensome red tape, improve vocational and technical training and restore stability and confidence in every level of government.

Cut taxes and regulations. We need to get our state budget under control but we also need to reform our Workman's Compensation laws. The state should be proactive by asking businesses what issues are holding them back from either coming here or expanding here. We should then address every one of those issues immediately.

Illinois should promote job creation by reducing taxes, and rolling back red tape and regulation that limit business. Changes to our state's workers' compensation system can save money for both taxpayers and businesses, while still protecting workers. If we bring our state's workers' compensation insurance rates on par with neighboring state's businesses could create thousands of new jobs in the process.

Furthermore, Springfield should not be in the business of interfering in how a local unit of government regulates their own collective bargaining process. Local governments are limited on job creating tools and having the ability to enact policies that promote worker freedom can make our state more competitive with neighboring right-to-work states. At the end of the day, it's not about being pro-employer or pro-employee, but rather being pro-employment. We should enact policies that allow for employers to create more jobs and employees to have higher take home pay.

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Illinois should get rid of the profiteers who take over government responsibilities only to minimize costs by firing people and by providing less than what we need.

Businesses considering coming to Illinois are drawn by its vibrant communities, world class research institutions, access to top quality talent, and robust infrastructure system. With this said, Illinois is still missing one key ingredient that is immediately taking our state off any shortlist for new manufacturing plants and business projects. This of course is the lack of a business-friendly, tax and regulatory environment that is conducive to economic growth.

The good news is we don't need to reinvent the wheel to turn things around. We can send the message that Illinois is open for business by looking to the reforms that some of our neighboring states have implemented successfully. Illinois should enact meaningful workers' compensation reform and pass a statewide right to work provision. We should also reduce barriers of entry into the labor force for licensed professions and identify places where our current licensing framework can be amended to make it easier for veterans and their spouses, first and second-generation Americans, and displaced persons to practice their trade. Most importantly, by passing a truly balanced budget and enacting serious political reforms, we can signal that Illinois' is serious about these reforms and is interested in providing businesses with long term political and economic stability.

Be competitive with our neighboring states. Lowering taxes, eliminating burdensome regulations, and lowering worker's compensation rates are a good place to start.

I really believe that job creation can be promoted if you take away some of the over-regulated laws that are in place for businesses. With some of the highest workman's compensation rates in the nation, it really discourages businesses from operating in Illinois. Combine that with a very high corporate tax rate and we now have two solid reasons for businesses to not operate in Illinois. Job creation is very difficult to make happen without businesses to offer jobs. Reforming workman's compensation program and lowering the corporate tax rate would be a great start to promoting job creation.

We need to reduce the regulatory burden in Illinois. We need to stop playing favorites and handing out special favors to connected insiders. Political corruption is strangling productivity. Businesses know that unless they have insider access - they can't compete in Illinois. Political corruption has to end. It is killing our economy. Taxes need to be lowered for everyone.

offer tax incentives for small businesses, increase funding for infrastructure projects.

First stabilize tax policy and freeze or reduce property taxes to allow businesses to plan. Assist small business development and growth. P.A. 100-0571 was a small step in assisting start up small businesses by reducing the cost of LLC filing fees, registration of name and dissolution. (need to look up or get your input on more)

Politicians and government do not create private sector jobs, but can only hope to create policy to promote them. Illinois should lower, defer, or waive fees or provide tax credits for new entrepreneurs, taxes and regulations should be reduced for new and emerging businesses, and those fees, costs, and taxes that must be paid should be made more streamlined as they may relate to different governmental entities.

I want someone from the 8th District with a few thousand dollars saved up and a great idea to be able to put it in commerce, not spend the entirety of her savings on paying layers upon layers of fees and costs just to get set up. Why establish huge hurdles before the starting line? Let's let our new entrepreneurs get started and get some momentum first.

Perhaps zoning and land use restrictions could be loosened to encourage businesses where there are extended vacancies or a business can show that location is important to its success. While LLC and corporation fees have rightly been lowered recently, they should be waived entirely for new entrepreneurs, minority owned businesses, and so on.

It is nonsensical that a fortune 500 company would pay the same Secretary of State filing and renewal fee to start an Illinois based subsidiary as a contractor setting up a home improvement business for the first time. Further Illinois can encourage business to go green and create incentives for them to do so with the help of green energy companies with products or services from Illinois. Illinois should take these steps necessary to create an environment where people are encouraged to start and grow businesses, innovate, activate and invigorate the local economy, and hire our residents.

We need to show businesses that they can believe in what Illinois is, and what Illinois can and will be. Business owners care about many things: stability and certainty, demand for their service/products, high quality workforce, strong infrastructure, and reasonable tax levels. The areas where Illinois has lagged over the last few years have been stability and certainty, which has created real upheaval for Illinois businesses. As such, in order to promote job creation, we need to pass budgets in a timely manner, reform our tax code, invest in our infrastructure, and fully fund on higher education system.

Illinois needs to invest in companies that invest in the state. We need to maintain and train an educated workforce. Invest in infrastructure and schools. Partner with both national and international partners to bring in more businesses.

My answer above is also the answer to job creation. By investing in infrastructure, public education and our local communities, we create a stable environment where businesses can thrive with an educated workforce, and a place where their employees will want to live and raise families.

As said above, first and foremost we need to invest in people. This means investing in our education system instead of continually cutting costs. Companies can't succeed without access to a qualified workforce. That's why I so strongly support developing Career and Technology Education programs throughout the state, and those already in place in the northwest suburbs are great ones to model. Second, we need to invest in infrastructure. During the past three years, our infrastructure has continued to deteriorate as the governor and legislature have battled over the budget. Illinois is a major transportation hub, one of our greatest assets, and we need an infrastructure that continues to support this. Third, to encourage startups, the state should continue to encourage angel and venture capital investing while supporting technology transfer programs which connect research at our universities and colleges to new product development in the private sector

IL has so much to offer to the job creators as it is now. Our location and transportation are a big plus. The beauty of Lake Michigan and the excitement of Chicago with its arts and varied neighborhoods are very attractive, particularly to the younger residents. Many people want to come here, but the business community has their fears. The potential businesses want: (1) for us to address our ongoing fiscal problems, primarily the debt (so they don't get socked with this all at once some day); (2) to provide more stability for the business environment (for example not changing tax rates so often); (3) for us to finally grow up and shed our reputation for corruption. I have addressed solutions to all of these above.

Another change that business would like to see concerns workman's compensation laws. IL recently ranked as the fourth most expensive state for businesses to acquire compensation insurance. Some have argued about the reasons for this, but it seems clear that a big part of it is our standard for causation where recovery is allowed if the plaintiff can simply show that the injury may have been caused by the workplace. I would support changing that.

As to the efficacy of utilizing tax incentives to attract business, I am not in favor of this at all (with the possible exception of a huge employer like Amazon, but even then it has to be tied to real benchmarks for gains to the State). IL is already losing a large part of its potential corporate income tax revenue in special incentives as it is. I believe that this also feeds into the general perception that a new business simply cannot get a fair deal here (the same as their competitor would be getting) unless they have inside connections (for which they have to "pay to play") to get them the same treatment. It leads to an apparently corrupt system that makes the honest business not even want to try.

Lastly, I do think that our government needs to work better with business and industry. One example of this is that with their assistance we need to make sure that our community colleges and workforce development providers are helping students gain the type of skills that are in demand. The legislature should also do more to obtain the opinions of experts outside of government to foster better programs.

We need to think about creating good jobs for everyone, not just white-collar professionals or those who work downtown. I am not someone who is against incentivizing large job creators to come to Illinois, but we need to really look at the deal we're making with big corporations, like Amazon, to bring them to the city. It's vital that businesses coming here rise up our entire communities, not just help those who are already at the top.

Better and more understandable small business tax laws and regulations.

Make Illinois competitive. Enact legislation that lowers the cost of doing business here. Pass real reforms at the state level to prevent lawsuit abuse. If we can bring down worker's compensation costs, it will benefit not only the businesses that have to pay then, but also the workers that are seeking jobs. If we drive down costs, existing businesses are free to hire more workers and put more money out into the local communities where workers live. Retailers need consumers with money to spend, as do restaurants and recreational facilities. In 2010, Indiana put property tax caps to the voters and set fixed property tax rates homes, farmland, and businesses in their state constitution. It saved taxpayers almost half a billion dollars and brought stability and predictability into their system. Illinois needs these kinds of reforms to create jobs, keep people living here, and raise the standard of living. Our state possesses tremendous assets and resources, which includes a strong workforce. We are struggling to attract jobs not because Illinois in inherently unable to compete, but because of poor public policy that prevents us from doing so effectively.

Coupled with business reforms and tax cuts, we need to enact policies to encourage new business formation, self-employment opportunities, and encourage people to form additional part-time businesses. Also, Illinois must first target industries where it has a distinct natural, competitive advantage, such as production agriculture, transportation industries and industries that utilize rail, river and barge transportation, and industries that need large amounts of water.

We need to roll back business regulations and we need to end the practice of crony capitalism where government picks winners and losers. Too often, political insiders get perks no one else gets. If we lowered taxes, rolled back regulations, enacted lawsuit reform, made workers' compensation rates more affordable — we would have a level playing field for everyone and we would not have to give out special perks and privileges to get companies to locate here.

Coupled with business reforms and tax cuts, we need to enact policies to encourage new business formation, self-employment opportunities, and encourage people to form additional part-time businesses. Also, Illinois must first target industries where it has a distinct natural, competitive advantage, such as production agriculture, transportation industries and industries that utilize rail, river and barge transportation, and industries that need large amounts of water.

We need to roll back business regulations and we need to end the practice of crony capitalism where government picks winners and losers. Too often, political insiders get perks no one else gets. If we lowered taxes, rolled back regulations, enacted lawsuit reform, made workers' compensation rates more affordable — we would have a level playing field for everyone and we would not have to give out special perks and privileges to get companies to locate here.

Make Illinois competitive. Enact legislation that lowers the cost of doing business here. Pass real reforms at the state level to prevent lawsuit abuse. If we can bring down worker's compensation costs, it will benefit not only the businesses that have to pay then, but also the workers that are seeking jobs. If we drive down costs, existing businesses are free to hire more workers and put more money out into the local communities where workers live. Retailers need consumers with money to spend, as do restaurants and recreational facilities. In 2010, Indiana put property tax caps to the voters and set fixed property tax rates homes, farmland, and businesses in their state constitution. It saved taxpayers almost half a billion dollars and brought stability and predictability into their system. Illinois needs these kinds of reforms to create jobs, keep people living here, and raise the standard of living. Our state possesses tremendous assets and resources, which includes a strong workforce. We are struggling to attract jobs not because Illinois in inherently unable to compete, but because of poor public policy that prevents us from doing so effectively.

Better and more understandable small business tax laws and regulations.

Become business friendly, by giving reasonable tax breaks to companies who will come to the state and create jobs.

While there has been growth in some areas and the stock market, too many people are either under-employed or employed in jobs with no future, no benefits or job security. Youth unemployment, especially in low-income communities, rural communities and communities of color is too high. Black youth (aged 16-24) had over 3 times the average unemployment rate for white youth in July 2017. Latino youth unemployment was 25% higher than white youth. The percentage of the workforce unemployed, temporarily employed or involuntarily in part-time employment is still 8%. The median hourly wage is still only $14 per hour.

Clean energy is the absolute clearest path to the future. Every community needs cheap energy sources and retrofits to conserve it and every community supports pitching in to prevent our children and grandchildren from having to suffer under a changed climate.

While there has been growth in some areas and the stock market, too many people are either under-employed or employed in jobs with no future, no benefits or job security. Youth unemployment, especially in low-income communities, rural communities and communities of color is too high. Black youth (aged 16-24) had over 3 times the average unemployment rate for white youth in July 2017. Latino youth unemployment was 25% higher than white youth. The percentage of the workforce unemployed, temporarily employed or involuntarily in part-time employment is still 8%. The median hourly wage is still only $14 per hour.

Clean energy is the absolute clearest path to the future. Every community needs cheap energy sources and retrofits to conserve it and every community supports pitching in to prevent our children and grandchildren from having to suffer under a changed climate.

States with jobs and job growth attract people from other states. While much of economic growth involves factors the state government does not control, it is also true that the State of Illinois has created a climate of uncertainty because of the budget stalemate. The first thing we have to do is come up with a realistic plan to address our fiscal issues so that businesses have the stability they need to make long-term planning decisions, such as building a factory. Another factor we control is the ability to provide employers with top-rate employees, and that means fixing our schools. I am confident that Illinois will become an engine of economic growth when we create fiscal stability, invest in our schools, and create working infrastructure that allows businesses to thrive.

Our goal must be to foster the creation of living wage jobs, in both emerging industries and basic services. Illinois should look to emerging industries in which it can grow new enterprises and jobs, including clean energy and high tech jobs, which will also benefit all residents of Illinois. We need to invest in the state's infrastructure, including new capital expenditures on transportation. Illinois should also invest in improving education and training across the state, to ensure that we have a capable and diverse workforce that will attract employers. This includes K-12 education; alternative options for those who have left traditional schools; job training, especially in the areas where we are experiencing and project labor shortages. Our once-strong higher education system needs to be stabilized so that we can recruit and train the most talented students to Illinois.

I'm sounding like a broken record, but it should make education a top priority and invest in a cradle to career education strategy that emphasizes early childhood education and builds world-class higher education institutions. Right now, Illinois is experiencing a brain drain. We are losing our best and brightest students to neighboring states where tuition is cheaper, scholarships more plentiful and educational institution reputations are more appealing. We must fix these issues in order to keep young people here in Illinois and to stay competitive and appealing to employers. Additionally, Illinois should invest in infrastructure to rebuild crumbling bridges and roads while stimulating job creation.

States with jobs and job growth attract people from other states. While much of economic growth involves factors the state government does not control, it is also true that the State of Illinois has created a climate of uncertainty because of the budget stalemate. The first thing we have to do is come up with a realistic plan to address our fiscal issues so that businesses have the stability they need to make long-term planning decisions, such as building a factory. Another factor we control is the ability to provide employers with top-rate employees, and that means fixing our schools. I am confident that Illinois will become an engine of economic growth when we create fiscal stability, invest in our schools, and create working infrastructure that allows businesses to thrive.

Our goal must be to foster the creation of living wage jobs, in both emerging industries and basic services. Illinois should look to emerging industries in which it can grow new enterprises and jobs, including clean energy and high tech jobs, which will also benefit all residents of Illinois. We need to invest in the state's infrastructure, including new capital expenditures on transportation. Illinois should also invest in improving education and training across the state, to ensure that we have a capable and diverse workforce that will attract employers. This includes K-12 education; alternative options for those who have left traditional schools; job training, especially in the areas where we are experiencing and project labor shortages. Our once-strong higher education system needs to be stabilized so that we can recruit and train the most talented students to Illinois.

I'm sounding like a broken record, but it should make education a top priority and invest in a cradle to career education strategy that emphasizes early childhood education and builds world-class higher education institutions. Right now, Illinois is experiencing a brain drain. We are losing our best and brightest students to neighboring states where tuition is cheaper, scholarships more plentiful and educational institution reputations are more appealing. We must fix these issues in order to keep young people here in Illinois and to stay competitive and appealing to employers. Additionally, Illinois should invest in infrastructure to rebuild crumbling bridges and roads while stimulating job creation.

There should be more incentives for small businesses. Also, businesses should be required to hire within the community and the state. There are far too many residents of neighboring states commuting to jobs in Illinois.

Illinois must nurture entrepreneurs and small business to develop businesses and to keep those businesses in the state. Illinois must prepare skilled future employees. I elaborate on this in the sections above. Businesses will go to a state that has a well-prepared workforce. We must have it and we must market to corporations and businesses that we have it- the place to have a business with skilled employees should be Illinois, not another state in the Midwest or across the nation.

Invest in existing small business and start ups. We should invest in a 21st century workforce development plan — schools currently are not responsive to needs of manufacturing centers, and educators need to invest in world-class education while listening to the industrial sector.

Illinois must nurture entrepreneurs and small business to develop businesses and to keep those businesses in the state. Illinois must prepare skilled future employees. I elaborate on this in the sections above. Businesses will go to a state that has a well-prepared workforce. We must have it and we must market to corporations and businesses that we have it- the place to have a business with skilled employees should be Illinois, not another state in the Midwest or across the nation.

We need to get ahead of the game I believe energy is the future we should invest in energy manufacturing devices jobs.

Job creation is critical. Equally critical is that job creation not come at the expense of the health, safety, or living standard of the folks working those newly created jobs. The most pro-business piece of legislation up for consideration in the next session is my bill to legalize adult use marijuana. With that one piece of legislation, we could create an entirely new economic sector. We've seen the economic boom that accompanies legalization in other states, and I want those thousands of new, well-compensated jobs for Illinois workers.

I would say part of it is marketing and explaining to businesses all the strengths Illinois has, how we are a transportation hub and our diverse populations that translate to a diverse talented workforce that is matched by few states. Specifically, I like what Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Bruce Rauner are doing to bring a second Amazon headquarters to Illinois. The mere fact that such a company is even considering Illinois as such a strong contender is proof of the potential that we already have as a state that neighboring states do not have. If we fix our major political and financial problems then our potential kind of speaks for itself. I also support providing incentives such as tax credits for small businesses who hire new employees.

I would say part of it is marketing and explaining to businesses all the strengths Illinois has, how we are a transportation hub and our diverse populations that translate to a diverse talented workforce that is matched by few states. Specifically, I like what Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Bruce Rauner are doing to bring a second Amazon headquarters to Illinois. The mere fact that such a company is even considering Illinois as such a strong contender is proof of the potential that we already have as a state that neighboring states do not have. If we fix our major political and financial problems then our potential kind of speaks for itself. I also support providing incentives such as tax credits for small businesses who hire new employees.

To promote real job creation, we're going to have to make Illinois a business and job creation friendly environment. I will wait to see if Illinois benefits from the Trump Administration deregulations and 2018 Tax Plan that was just passed and determine if we are going to see companies and manufacturing return to our state.

To promote real job creation, we're going to have to make Illinois a business and job creation friendly environment. I will wait to see if Illinois benefits from the Trump Administration deregulations and 2018 Tax Plan that was just passed and determine if we are going to see companies and manufacturing return to our state.

Continue growing our areas of strength -- agriculture, technology, medicine, finance, recreation, education, tourism, and environmental restoration.

Small businesses should get more tax incentives to grow. Amazon would be great but not everyone can or should work for Amazon. I would work with City of Chicago to push back on the negative images of the city that come out of Trump and others as well.

offer tax incentives for small businesses, increase funding for infrastructure projects.

Illinois should focus on more than the once-in-a-generation opportunities like massive retailers. We should a focus on small businesses that generate significant revenue, hire locally and provide unique opportunities for individuals to develop more marketable skillsets quicker than some larger entities. Illinois also needs to remove some of the regulation and barriers to licensing for all residents. More specifically, Illinois has to have a focus on ensuring those who have paid their debt to society are able to reintegrate into society with an opportunity to be gainfully employed. This reduces recidivism which has a correlation with job creation and opportunities.

Illinois should increase manufacturing jobs and R&D credits innovation.

Pass a balanced budget. Work on lowering Worker's Compensation premiums.

Illinois must proactively pursue the industries of the future, including green energy and green manufacturing. Illinois must invest more in higher education and workforce development to attract these industries. Silicon Valley was made possible by Stanford, while the Massachusetts miracle of the 1980's which saw the state transform a dreary, stagnant industrial economy into a thriving technologically oriented one was possible because of MIT. Illinois has the higher education assets in Northwestern, University of Chicago and UI Champaign to supply a knowledge based economy and Naperville is already deemed the Silicon Valley of the prairies. We should actively build on this momentum.

Invest in our crumbling infrastructure;
Focusing on making Illinois a state that exports more than coal and college students. If we fund resources that will grow our small and medium-sized businesses, we can create more jobs;
Commit to green and clean energy; and
Legalize recreational marijuana. The recreational marijuana industry created roughly 18,000 full time jobs in Colorado, and Illinois has more than twice the population of Colorado — a conservative estimate would be the creation of about 36,000 new, full-time jobs.

Job development also requires neighborhoods to be safe and secure. As a legislator I will seek to work with member of the district to find the best ideas of how to improve policing within the community and to improve the relationships between law enforcement and the residents.

For companies deciding whether to move or expand their business here, the most important thing we can do is to create a stable, predictable financial footing for the state. No more prolonged struggles over budgets and anti-union agendas. As noted in Innovation Illinois, "The best thing Rauner could do to promote jobs is to settle on a budget with the legislature that sustainably funds state services and lowers deficits, setting tax rates that won't yo-yo with every change in administration. There won't be Springfield chaos to scare the job creators." https://innovationillinois.org/blog/2016/12/23/job-growth-not-illinois/
We also need to do a better job of promoting ourselves. As Gov. Rauner pointed out in his report to the bonding agencies for the funds to refinance the debt created by our overdue bills, Illinois is a great place to do business. We are a center of commerce, transportation, tech innovation, higher education, housing, and culture. And, we sit on the largest body of fresh water in the continent. We have a strong educated workforce. All of this is important to attracting businesses to Illinois. It is also important to individuals and businesses currently in the state that are considering starting-up or expanding.

Businesses need stability. They need to know that the state government will be able to pass a budget each year. We need to invest in the resources that job-creators value — quality education (at all levels, including higher education) to create a highly educated workforce, infrastructure that can safely move products and people, and human services for children and the elderly. I support reducing the tax burden on the small and medium-sized employers in our communities and ensuring that every corporation is paying something in taxes. I support expanding credits and incentives for businesses that choose to relocate to or expand in Illinois and create new, good-paying jobs in the state. I also support investment in green technology that will create jobs of the future.

We need to incentivise small businesses by creating tax credits for them that are connected to job creation. Good paying jobs that are needed in our community will come directly from supporting small businesses. When we support small business we support community and family.

In order to attract people, businesses, and jobs, Illinois must rapidly get its finances in order. 1) To begin, we must rid ourselves of Mike Madigan, Jim Durkin, and Joe Berrios from not only political power, but from government power. We must replace them with people who have an understanding of basic math. 2) Next, we implement the tenets of the Federal DATA Act of 2014- making our financial reporting transparent- this will not only cut down the corruption created by Mike Madigan, Jim Durkin, and Joe Berrios, but will show business interests that we are an honest place to do business and that our financial dealings are above board (for an example on which state to benchmark, see www.OhioCheckBook.com). 3) After this, we outlaw lawmakers from profiting from their financial mismanagement (property tax appeals, vendor assistance programs, etc.) 4) Now we implement an economic plan for Illinois. This includes lowering our energy costs to attract manufacturing. We embark on a statewide review on what our competitive advantages are, and market ourselves to the international, national, and regional markets. 5) We work to lower healthcare and education costs, as well as property taxes in order to attract people, businesses, and jobs and grow our way out of the financial mess that Mike Madigan, Jim Durkin, and Joe Berrios have placed us in.

We need to look at the interrelationship between job readiness, workforce development, and job creation. As I speak with employers in high growth companies in my district, they are not able to recruit and retain employees to meet their needs. This, in turn, hinders employer's ability to expand. We need to provide incentives to high schools and community colleges in particular to build targeted programming for high growth jobs and enable us to better prepare our young people for higher wage careers.

For companies deciding whether to move or expand their business here, the most important thing we can do is to create a stable, predictable financial footing for the state. No more prolonged struggles over budgets and anti-union agendas. As noted in Innovation Illinois, "The best thing Rauner could do to promote jobs is to settle on a budget with the legislature that sustainably funds state services and lowers deficits, setting tax rates that won't yo-yo with every change in administration. There won't be Springfield chaos to scare the job creators." https://innovationillinois.org/blog/2016/12/23/job-growth-not-illinois/
We also need to do a better job of promoting ourselves. As Gov. Rauner pointed out in his report to the bonding agencies for the funds to refinance the debt created by our overdue bills, Illinois is a great place to do business. We are a center of commerce, transportation, tech innovation, higher education, housing, and culture. And, we sit on the largest body of fresh water in the continent. We have a strong educated workforce. All of this is important to attracting businesses to Illinois. It is also important to individuals and businesses currently in the state that are considering starting-up or expanding.

Businesses need stability. They need to know that the state government will be able to pass a budget each year. We need to invest in the resources that job-creators value — quality education (at all levels, including higher education) to create a highly educated workforce, infrastructure that can safely move products and people, and human services for children and the elderly. I support reducing the tax burden on the small and medium-sized employers in our communities and ensuring that every corporation is paying something in taxes. I support expanding credits and incentives for businesses that choose to relocate to or expand in Illinois and create new, good-paying jobs in the state. I also support investment in green technology that will create jobs of the future.

We need to incentivise small businesses by creating tax credits for them that are connected to job creation. Good paying jobs that are needed in our community will come directly from supporting small businesses. When we support small business we support community and family.

In order to attract people, businesses, and jobs, Illinois must rapidly get its finances in order. 1) To begin, we must rid ourselves of Mike Madigan, Jim Durkin, and Joe Berrios from not only political power, but from government power. We must replace them with people who have an understanding of basic math. 2) Next, we implement the tenets of the Federal DATA Act of 2014- making our financial reporting transparent- this will not only cut down the corruption created by Mike Madigan, Jim Durkin, and Joe Berrios, but will show business interests that we are an honest place to do business and that our financial dealings are above board (for an example on which state to benchmark, see www.OhioCheckBook.com). 3) After this, we outlaw lawmakers from profiting from their financial mismanagement (property tax appeals, vendor assistance programs, etc.) 4) Now we implement an economic plan for Illinois. This includes lowering our energy costs to attract manufacturing. We embark on a statewide review on what our competitive advantages are, and market ourselves to the international, national, and regional markets. 5) We work to lower healthcare and education costs, as well as property taxes in order to attract people, businesses, and jobs and grow our way out of the financial mess that Mike Madigan, Jim Durkin, and Joe Berrios have placed us in.

We need to look at the interrelationship between job readiness, workforce development, and job creation. As I speak with employers in high growth companies in my district, they are not able to recruit and retain employees to meet their needs. This, in turn, hinders employer's ability to expand. We need to provide incentives to high schools and community colleges in particular to build targeted programming for high growth jobs and enable us to better prepare our young people for higher wage careers.

The first thing Illinois should do is elect a governor who is committed to talking about all the reasons why a business should come to Illinois instead of bragging about how he encourages them to leave. Illinois has unparalleled access to roads, rail, air transit, and water. We have access to plentiful and cheap energy and an educated and accessible workforce. Businesses want to be here. We should make creating a financially and politically stable government our first priority and then our new governor can go out and sell Illinois to businesses and finally provide growth.

In my opinion, the role of government is not to employ everyone, but it's to create a climate that allows business to prosper and hire everyone.

In my opinion, the role of government is not to employ everyone, but it's to create a climate that allows business to prosper and hire everyone.

The first thing Illinois should do is elect a governor who is committed to talking about all the reasons why a business should come to Illinois instead of bragging about how he encourages them to leave. Illinois has unparalleled access to roads, rail, air transit, and water. We have access to plentiful and cheap energy and an educated and accessible workforce. Businesses want to be here. We should make creating a financially and politically stable government our first priority and then our new governor can go out and sell Illinois to businesses and finally provide growth.

As stated above, Illinois needs to streamline government at all levels to reduce our tax burden, reform our regulations so they are in line with neighboring states to be competitive when vying for jobs, and ensure that our K-12 and higher education systems are preparing students for jobs that exist in the global, 21st century economy.

Create pro-growth and pro-jobs bills that will help job creations in Illinois. We need to target manufactures to move to Illinois and help them with tax credits that will create jobs and help our economic development.

The reduction of LLC filing fees was an excellent step in promoting job creation, as small businesses are hurt the most by high initial and annual fees.

Lower property taxes.
Lower income taxes.
Eliminate corruption
The above will keep the productive tax paying citizens from leaving.

Illinois needs to improve its business climate. The General Assembly needs to pass pro-growth, pro job legislation such as workers compensation reform and targeted tax credits for job creation. We have antiquated labor polices and I believe like Governor Rauner when he talked about his Turnaround Agenda that we should become a Right to Work State. Multi-national and other large corporations have made it clear that they will not set down their business in this state with our labor policy as it is. Democrats and their strong labor union backers have tenacious blocked the ability for our State to become a Right to Work State.

As stated above, Illinois needs to streamline government at all levels to reduce our tax burden, reform our regulations so they are in line with neighboring states to be competitive when vying for jobs, and ensure that our K-12 and higher education systems are preparing students for jobs that exist in the global, 21st century economy.

Create pro-growth and pro-jobs bills that will help job creations in Illinois. We need to target manufactures to move to Illinois and help them with tax credits that will create jobs and help our economic development.

The reduction of LLC filing fees was an excellent step in promoting job creation, as small businesses are hurt the most by high initial and annual fees.

Lower property taxes.
Lower income taxes.
Eliminate corruption
The above will keep the productive tax paying citizens from leaving.

Illinois needs to improve its business climate. The General Assembly needs to pass pro-growth, pro job legislation such as workers compensation reform and targeted tax credits for job creation. We have antiquated labor polices and I believe like Governor Rauner when he talked about his Turnaround Agenda that we should become a Right to Work State. Multi-national and other large corporations have made it clear that they will not set down their business in this state with our labor policy as it is. Democrats and their strong labor union backers have tenacious blocked the ability for our State to become a Right to Work State.

I work with entrepreneurs looking to grow and succeed in Illinois. These are people with ideas and the drive to build companies whom we need to be fostering. Small business owners are hiring great percentages of the total work force and if we want to be a competitive state we must start with looking at policies that incentivize these leaders. Pro growth and pro job legislation should be a bipartisan issue- collectively we need to address the manufacturing job decline and give more opportunity to the middle class.

I work with entrepreneurs looking to grow and succeed in Illinois. These are people with ideas and the drive to build companies whom we need to be fostering. Small business owners are hiring great percentages of the total work force and if we want to be a competitive state we must start with looking at policies that incentivize these leaders. Pro growth and pro job legislation should be a bipartisan issue- collectively we need to address the manufacturing job decline and give more opportunity to the middle class.

I own a family-owned, local business that employs almost 200 local residents. My husband and I have created hundreds of local jobs over the years and our proud of our contribution not only to the local economy, but to our community as well. Being a small business owner as well as an elected official, I know how government can help or hurt businesses. I also know that it is not the government's role to create jobs, it is the private sector's role to create jobs. The best thing our state government can do to help the private sector create jobs is to create a business friendly climate with low taxes, low regulation, and certainty.

If Illinois wants to invest in existing programs, I believe in public-private partnerships for economic development and investing in tourism. I have been Chairman of Economic Development on the DuPage County Board for six years where I also serve on the Board of Directors of Choose DuPage, the County's public-private partnership, and the Board of Directors for the DuPage Convention and Visitors Bureau. Choose DuPage has facilitated in $34.3M square feet of development and 18,765 net jobs since its inception. The DCVB helps generate over $2.5 billion for DuPage County and the hospitality industry employs more than 23,000 workers. These are the two areas I would choose to invest in at the state level, but nothing can replace certainty in government and low taxes to entice businesses to invest in Illinois and thus create jobs.

I own a family-owned, local business that employs almost 200 local residents. My husband and I have created hundreds of local jobs over the years and our proud of our contribution not only to the local economy, but to our community as well. Being a small business owner as well as an elected official, I know how government can help or hurt businesses. I also know that it is not the government's role to create jobs, it is the private sector's role to create jobs. The best thing our state government can do to help the private sector create jobs is to create a business friendly climate with low taxes, low regulation, and certainty.

If Illinois wants to invest in existing programs, I believe in public-private partnerships for economic development and investing in tourism. I have been Chairman of Economic Development on the DuPage County Board for six years where I also serve on the Board of Directors of Choose DuPage, the County's public-private partnership, and the Board of Directors for the DuPage Convention and Visitors Bureau. Choose DuPage has facilitated in $34.3M square feet of development and 18,765 net jobs since its inception. The DCVB helps generate over $2.5 billion for DuPage County and the hospitality industry employs more than 23,000 workers. These are the two areas I would choose to invest in at the state level, but nothing can replace certainty in government and low taxes to entice businesses to invest in Illinois and thus create jobs.

1. Provide more incentives for keep businesses from leaving Illinois and attracting more.
2. Roll back the Illinois corporate tax hike.
3. Criminal justice reform aimed at second chances for potential employers and employees who may have challenging backgrounds.

Illinois should invest in companies that have the ability to transition ideas into new products and technology services. Additionally, we should create a plan for modern infrastructure with new construction jobs and financing instruments. Also invest in small businesses.

Illinois should invest in companies that have the ability to transition ideas into new products and technology services. Additionally, we should create a plan for modern infrastructure with new construction jobs and financing instruments. Also invest in small businesses.

Illinois should promote the educational institutions and the pool of college educated talent that is available to employers as the number one reason to move to Illinois.

Illinois should promote the educational institutions and the pool of college educated talent that is available to employers as the number one reason to move to Illinois.

We must invest in our youth. Illinois has a funding crisis facing K-12 education. Funding based on local property taxes in many rural, urban and suburban areas is inadequate. Illinois must further reform its funding method. Educational funding should be based on a graduated income tax. Illinois needs a highly skilled workforce with requisite training for 21st Century jobs. Additionally, we need property tax relief. Property tax relief is desperately needed in the Southland region. Illinois relies too heavily on property taxes to fund local governments.

1. Provide more incentives for keep businesses from leaving Illinois and attracting more.
2. Roll back the Illinois corporate tax hike.
3. Criminal justice reform aimed at second chances for potential employers and employees who may have challenging backgrounds.

We must invest in our youth. Illinois has a funding crisis facing K-12 education. Funding based on local property taxes in many rural, urban and suburban areas is inadequate. Illinois must further reform its funding method. Educational funding should be based on a graduated income tax. Illinois needs a highly skilled workforce with requisite training for 21st Century jobs. Additionally, we need property tax relief. Property tax relief is desperately needed in the Southland region. Illinois relies too heavily on property taxes to fund local governments.

Illinois is losing businesses and important job opportunities for families to our neighboring states, many of which have enacted right-to-work laws. Besides making our state more competitive, Illinois workers deserve the freedom to decide whether union representation is right for them. Additionally, right-to-work laws are often cited by companies as a factor they consider when determining new states to build their business. Besides right-to-work, we need to reduce regulations and cut the red tape that handcuffs businesses and makes it harder and more costly to set up shop Illinois. In order to make Illinois more competitive and business-friendly, we need to lower workers compensation costs and identify common-sense regulatory reforms to make it easier for businesses and entrepreneurs to grow and thrive.

Invest in clean and green energy! It has to be done at some point - why not now!!

Illinois is losing businesses and important job opportunities for families to our neighboring states, many of which have enacted right-to-work laws. Besides making our state more competitive, Illinois workers deserve the freedom to decide whether union representation is right for them. Additionally, right-to-work laws are often cited by companies as a factor they consider when determining new states to build their business. Besides right-to-work, we need to reduce regulations and cut the red tape that handcuffs businesses and makes it harder and more costly to set up shop Illinois. In order to make Illinois more competitive and business-friendly, we need to lower workers compensation costs and identify common-sense regulatory reforms to make it easier for businesses and entrepreneurs to grow and thrive.

This state has so many attractive qualities, including its location and educational institutions, that companies should clamoring to locate here. But, as detailed in the previous question, we need re-establish trust between elected officials and voters so we can make the tough decisions to get our financial house in order. Those steps will enable job creators to have confidence in a stable Illinois.