Illinois lost more residents than any other state in 2016 and the trend appears to be holding for 2017. What is the No. 1 reason, in your opinion, for the exodus?

General

One of the major reasons for the exodus of current businesses is the current workmen's compensation system. Illinois has the seventh highest workers comp premium rate of all U.S. states. Why should a local business stay here when they can move to Indiana and save millions of dollars per year? When businesses move, people are going to follow. 29 Illinois businesses have moved to Kenosha County, just across the border in recent years. Illinois has great asset: roads, air and rail transportation; great places to live; good schools (outside of Chicago); and a world class city. But business is about making money, and when a new business looks at the tax and regulatory restraints of Illinois, the decision on where to place a new facility isn't going to be here. The ineptitude of our state legislature to come even close to a balanced budget resulting in increased income taxes and the highest property taxes in the United States are also a major factor.

The crisis of trust in our elected leaders. Our fellow citizens do not believe things will get better in the next 3-5 years. People aren't leaving the state because of a lack of good ideas. They are leaving because of a lack of leadership.

Illinois has a terrible out-migration problem because politicians continue to choose tax hikes over reforming the status quo. Our property taxes continue to skyrocket and Springfield politicians led by House Speaker Mike Madigan recently enacted a 32% tax increase that didn't even balance our state's budget. All the while, lawmakers have refused to pass any meaningful reforms to state government that cut spending or create jobs. Illinois needs to embrace reform and be friendlier to taxpayers if we are to reverse out-migration problem.

As I walk door-to-door in my community, the majority of people I speak with are overwhelmed by the property taxes and are not certain how much longer they can afford to stay in their homes. From 2008-2015, property taxes grew 6 times faster than household incomes according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. For most families, their homes are their largest asset. Increasing property taxes are decreasing the return on their investment in home equity.

Although the standard answer is that the high rates of taxes in Illinois led to the exodus, I find more people convinced that failure of the state to provide promised services is leading people to give up on the state. There was no exodus until the current governor took office. His use of the veto to have his way is a huge obstruction that makes life here less comfortable.

Uncertainty. When we go two years without a budget, people lose faith that the State will provide necessary facilities and services. For example, we saw a net outflow of 18000 university students a year, in large measure because students were unsure that schools would remain open for the four years of their academic careers.

Job growth in other parts of the country that are more attractive (for many reasons) to live in than Illinois.

The budget impasse. People lost their jobs, students lost their grants, the sick died due to the impasse.

The budget impasse. People lost their jobs, students lost their grants, the sick died due to the impasse.

The high cost of living in Illinois.

You don't have to look any farther than taxes. Our property tax system is discouraging people from buying homes and making a life in our communities. Then you add a new 32% income tax increase and high sales taxes on top of it, there is little incentive for people not to leave for Indiana, Wisconsin, or Missouri. Our excessive corporate tax rate disheartens people who want to start their own business, or for those who feel they can expand and hire more people. Without those entrepreneurs succeeding in Illinois, there aren't going to be enough jobs to incentivize young people not to move out of state. It's an even bigger issue facing rural areas as so many leave our small towns for college and never come back. It isn't just a Chicago or suburban issue, it impacts every corner of the state.

Property taxes and sales taxes are being used to fund public policies and budgets that are unjustifiable, indefensible, unsustainable and unmanageable.

The tax and regulatory environment is bad for business and our neighboring states are attracting businesses and the jobs and residents that follow. Just look at the manufacturing sector. The combination of corporate income taxes, high property taxes, outsized workers' compensation costs and unemployment insurance have made it more attractive for manufacturers to locate their operations elsewhere. I have constituents in Burr Ridge who moved their steel and trucking companies across the border to Indiana for these very reasons.

Illinois' taxes are too high

According to recent studies the number one reason is high property taxes and number 2 is job change. Many companies are leaving as well and that adds to the exodus.

High taxes. High taxes are forcing retirees to move away, they make other states more enticing to middle class; growing families, are forcing businesses to close or move to more friendly states, and are keeping companies from investing in our great state because they can benefit more from being elsewhere.

The number one reason is our governing system throughout the state is not designed to benefit taxpayers. That means our challenges go well beyond the recent impasse at just the state level. We have too many units of local government, which leads to inefficiencies and higher taxes. We have a property tax system that is inequitable and has no protections for taxpayers which leads to higher property tax burdens. We have local governments that are mini versions of our state government with underfunded pension systems due to years of neglect. And we have a state government that - as outlined above - has been unable and unwilling to make the changes needed to bring Illinois into the 21st century. It's all led to high taxes, rising costs and a lack of confidence, which forces people to make life-altering decisions like moving to another state for a better quality of life.

The number one reason is taxation and all of the negative consequences of that taxation. When businesses leave our state so does opportunity. Businesses are leaving because of the untenable budget situation and the reliance on taxes as a solution. This has a negative effect on job creation and creates a vicious cycle that actually puts more of a burden on businesses who are here and does not create new taxpayers. When I talk to people in the 89th District most lament the fact that their children will be leaving Illinois for other lands of opportunity.

Illinois residents are fleeing our state because our taxes are too high, particularly Illinois' highest-in-the-nation property taxes. Year after year, Springfield lawmakers led by Madigan say they will freeze property taxes. In fact, they brag about passing property tax freezes umpteen times, yet property taxes continue to go up. And why? Because, once again, they refuse to change. Politicians use the issue of property taxes on campaign mailers, but actually do nothing about it. Similarly, politicians hike income taxes, but don't make any meaningful changes to state government. Illinois needs lower taxes if we are to keep jobs and families here and retain our status as the powerhouse of the Midwest.

The environment along with better opportunities that far surpass what Illinois currently has to offer. When you think about the quality of life for a young professional, young tradesman or a young family the key components are upward mobility, security and education. So if you take just what was done in 2016 in support of these three key areas:

Upward mobility: we increased taxes to pay for poor management of the past along with funding social programs for poor decision makers of the future.

Security: just created a sanctuary state, which said to the citizens, we will do what we can for those that are here illegally, but those of you that work hard and pay taxes, we aren't going to do anything to drive down gun violence or opioid abuse in your communities.

Education: Funding schools that are failing, de-incentivizing results.

Job creation was bringing people to Illinois. We need to create jobs again. At one time Illinois boasted almost 200,000 births in one year. We are more recently at 50,000. With a population near 12 million, such a change in birth rate has a significant impact.

I am running for state representative because I have heard from and seen too many of my peers make the decision to leave Illinois. They are not leaving because of the weather, they are leaving because our state's high cost of living and a tax burden that is making it impossible to maintain a future here. Without the means to change the elected officials we send to Springfield, Illinoisans are voting with their feet and moving to our neighboring states. States like Michigan, Wisconsin and Indiana that have their fiscal house in order and are growing at a breakneck pace.

Extremely high taxes.

I believe that people are leaving Illinois because we are the highest taxed state in the nation. Our high property taxes, increased income tax, and the high corporate tax make it difficult for families to stay. This is especially true when neighboring states offer a better living and business environment fiscally.

High taxes.

Jobs Housing Healthcare Taxes

Notwithstanding the retiring baby boomer generation, taxes, the prospect of more taxes, politics, and a widespread belief that the system is 'fixed' in Illinois to help those that are on the 'in.'

Illinois's ongoing budget crisis is the No. 1 reason that Illinois has lost more residents than any other state in 2016. It has created real problems and Illinois residents have responded in kind. The general assembly's willingness to finally pass a balanced budget helps put the state on a path towards stability. The state of Illinois has been a fiscal mess for years, but it has been made significantly worse over the last three years. If you were a college student, would you choose to go to college in Illinois when Governor Rauner has continually cut higher education funding?

The business climate and lack of economic growth is a significant reason for our declining population, but not the only one. We must also look toward government regulation, workforce readiness, tax policies (property taxes), low performing schools and violence

One leading factor that is within the control of elected leaders is the perception that Illinois is mismanaged and corrupt. The state did not have a budget for two years, our tax rate and revenue sources were uncertain, and we still do not have a solid plan for how the state is going to fund pension debt. All these have contributed to a sense of uncertainty, mismanagement, and instability. Residents and business cannot make plans for their future when their government does not function properly and makes unpredictable decisions with serious impact on people's lives. For example, threats to our social safety net from having no state budget led some of people who rely on those services to leave, as well as many young people, like Early Intervention therapists, to build their careers in a more secure environment. Some business have left the state because they could not make a 10 year plan and grow their business if they had no certainty of the tax rate and fiscal condition of the state.

In addition, not only are property taxes high, but Cook County residents justifiably feel that the system is stacked against the average homeowner, and in favor of those who can afford the high-priced property tax attorneys who contribute to the tax officials' campaign coffers. Electing more reform-minded and truly independent leaders who are willing to work across the aisle and whose only interest is the public interest, would restore confidence that the state is on a stable and promising future. We also cannot discount the role of unemployment and underemployment in Illinois, especially relative to its neighboring states. Unemployment data indicates that Illinois's unemployment rates are at least 1.5% higher than almost all of its neighbors. Thus, we must focus on policies that stimulate the growth of well-paying jobs.

The number 1 reason is the failure of Gov. Rauner to negotiate a budget compromise, keep vital services and higher education funded, and demonstrate to prospective employers that his government will do it's part to nurture a just, stable economy in which businesses can thrive.

I believe there are multiple reasons why residents leave Illinois, including: -A growing percentage of people are aging and moving to warmer climates. -The consolidation and mechanization of agribusiness is resulting in the deaths of many downstate small towns. -University students and faculty have left Illinois as a result of reduced funding and financial aid to our state schools. -An over-dependence on property taxes for funding schools and local governments is driving some residents out of state.

Due to personal and business taxes and the regulatory environment, the loss of jobs and the movement of jobs out of state is the #1 reason for the exodus. Another important reason is the cost of housing due to property taxes specifically.

Due to personal and business taxes and the regulatory environment, the loss of jobs and the movement of jobs out of state is the #1 reason for the exodus. Another important reason is the cost of housing due to property taxes specifically.

A lack of opportunity in communities across the state is the number one reason. People without the prospect of a long-term, quality job opt to move. Retirees on fixed income and others are slowly being priced out of their homes by rising property taxes. Our state ranks near the bottom of lists that measure a state's friendliness to business (CNBC, NFIB, etc.) and rather that offering businesses an environment where they can thrive, Illinois has created a suffocating atmosphere of high taxes, high worker's compensation costs, pervasive lawsuits, unnecessary regulations on certain industries, and instability regarding what future policies from Springfield might be. Taken together, many industries have opted to leave the state altogether (trucking, for example), while others have few reasons to locate here, when given the choice between Illinois and communities in neighboring states.

We have great workers, but our infrastructure is being neglected, small business struggle with start-up cost, fuel and licensing taxes, LLC, and workers compensation taxes, and loosely controlled causation laws. Businesses are going to nearby (or other) states and taking our workers.

In my opinion, high taxes and fees are disproportionately hurting the middle class and poor communities. Although I do see younger people and diverse families moving into my district, we are still seeing too many people who work hard but are not getting ahead. They're not seeing their incomes increase, but they are seeing increased burdens, which are hurting their incomes. As a result, people are looking for relief away from Illinois. Our local and state governments saw a backlog of bills that were not paid due to the uncertainty of the budget and our residents paid the price with higher fees for decreased services.

There is a trend and it is a big concern. People are always going to leave a state for various reasons. Besides elderly moving to the Sun Belt, the rural portions of the state have been seeing a very consistent exodus for probably a generation. The population of Chicago is still doing well as young people and some businesses continue to flock here. Metropolitan Chicago and the entire rest of the state are not doing so well.

The question is why we continue to have a net migration out of the state. I think that the primary answer is fear. The perception is part of the problem. The perception is that IL is corrupt, dysfunctional, and crime-infested, that we have high taxes, and that our debt is going to bring us to bankruptcy or many years of pain. Some of this is true, but not all of it. A Gallup poll in 2015 found that only 25% of IL citizens have confidence in their government, which was the lowest in the nation by a large margin. IL is consistently ranked by outsiders as one of the least liked states in the nation and ranks near the bottom of the list in terms of climate for business.

Examining these fears individually:

Corruption: Our history unfortunately speaks for itself. Four of the last nine governors were jailed. People have the perception that you have to "pay to play" in order to get the assistance a new business might need. That dissuades a lot of people. I believe just as "Only Nixon Can go to China", that Illinois is in a unique position to address the issue of political corruption by enacting sweeping campaign finance reform that limits special interest control in our state and local elections and sets a model for the country.

Crime: It is unfortunate that fear-mongers, all the way up to our President, like to use Chicago as some sort of national Boogy-Man when it comes to crime. Chicago has significant crime issues on-par with many other big cities. We must pursue solutions to further bring down gun violence. But that said, I have had out-of-state friends ask if it is safe to drive to Rosemont! Crime is a real problem, but the attempt to paint our great City and State as some sort of dystopian landscape are unfair and inaccurate and more should be done by everyone, to correct that false image.

High Taxes: Illinois ranks as 29th best in terms of overall taxation. Not great, but not awful, but absolutely essential to pull us out of this mess. Stability in tax rates would be a big part of the solution to this problem of perception.

Public Debt: This is the single greatest challenge that we face and contrary to the thoughts of many, bankruptcy is not an option for a state. We are going to have to work our way up out of this one and it will be painful. But It must be done.

The lack of leadership in both parties and the failure of both parties to put the people first instead of their political survival.

The lack of leadership in both parties and the failure of both parties to put the people first instead of their political survival.

While the slow increase in jobs has played a significant role, high energy, housing and transportation costs — especially outside of NE Illinois has probably played a major role.

While the slow increase in jobs has played a significant role, high energy, housing and transportation costs — especially outside of NE Illinois has probably played a major role.

It's hard to say that there is one particular reason for a decline in population of 0.2%. Other states lost a larger percentage of population, such as Wyoming which lost 3%. Any one of several demographic factors could account for Illinois' small decline. Of course, we want Illinois to be growing, and to grow we need to provide the conditions for good jobs, good schools, and a high quality of life.

The slow increase in job growth, especially outside northeastern Illinois, coupled with uncertainties over the State's budget have created a narrative that Illinois not only lacks opportunities but is also an unstable and dysfunctional place to live. This narrative fuels people's natural distrust of government and feeds the idea that Illinoisans are not getting the services and opportunities that their taxes are paying for.

Additionally, Illinois has, especially since Governor Rauner became governor, ignored its obligation to invest in its people. Whether its education (K-12 and higher ed), job training, infrastructure, small business, or social services, we see our government abandoning its obligation to take tax dollars and deploy them for their best and highest use — investment in our citizens.

The average temperature being -5 degrees for a week certainly doesn't help. My family came here from Mexico for opportunity and the incessant attacks on families like mine by political figures in this country have had the desired effect of making it difficult to immigrate to the United States. That hurts population growth in a state like Illinois which has historically welcomed immigrants. The political chaos caused by Bruce Rauner contributes to this mess, but I don't believe ordinary people factor in political leadership when deciding where to raise their families. They want job opportunities, good communities, great schools and a fair shake. That's what we have to provide.

It's hard to say that there is one particular reason for a decline in population of 0.2%. Other states lost a larger percentage of population, such as Wyoming which lost 3%. Any one of several demographic factors could account for Illinois' small decline. Of course, we want Illinois to be growing, and to grow we need to provide the conditions for good jobs, good schools, and a high quality of life.

The slow increase in job growth, especially outside northeastern Illinois, coupled with uncertainties over the State's budget have created a narrative that Illinois not only lacks opportunities but is also an unstable and dysfunctional place to live. This narrative fuels people's natural distrust of government and feeds the idea that Illinoisans are not getting the services and opportunities that their taxes are paying for.

Additionally, Illinois has, especially since Governor Rauner became governor, ignored its obligation to invest in its people. Whether its education (K-12 and higher ed), job training, infrastructure, small business, or social services, we see our government abandoning its obligation to take tax dollars and deploy them for their best and highest use — investment in our citizens.

The average temperature being -5 degrees for a week certainly doesn't help. My family came here from Mexico for opportunity and the incessant attacks on families like mine by political figures in this country have had the desired effect of making it difficult to immigrate to the United States. That hurts population growth in a state like Illinois which has historically welcomed immigrants. The political chaos caused by Bruce Rauner contributes to this mess, but I don't believe ordinary people factor in political leadership when deciding where to raise their families. They want job opportunities, good communities, great schools and a fair shake. That's what we have to provide.

We must be able to Build a Life- with jobs and key services, or we will move to where we can. The number one reason for residents leaving our state is that they believe Illinois is irresponsible and erratic in supporting its residents and making things work. If a resident don't have stable systems that fund key services and provide a safe environment to live, learn, work, and play- then he or she will think about which other state they can rely on.

I believe state taxes are the number one reason that people leave the state.

We must be able to Build a Life- with jobs and key services, or we will move to where we can. The number one reason for residents leaving our state is that they believe Illinois is irresponsible and erratic in supporting its residents and making things work. If a resident don't have stable systems that fund key services and provide a safe environment to live, learn, work, and play- then he or she will think about which other state they can rely on.

Economic opportunity, specifically the lack of jobs that pay a living wage.

Economic opportunity, specifically the lack of jobs that pay a living wage.

I believe state taxes are the number one reason that people leave the state.

In my estimation, the primary driver for outmigration is our inability to generate a stable path forward. We lower taxes, then raise taxes. We cut services, then restore them. We starve public education of funds, then restore them to bare minimum. We continue vacillating in a state of near-chaos, and have for years. Why send your kids to Illinois schools when you aren't sure if they'll have enough money to open in the fall? That was a fair question for Illinois parents to ask just a few months ago. We can no longer lurch from crisis to crisis and expect people to stick around for it.

I do think our broken political system that has resulted in some of the highest taxes in the country are part of the reason that some people feel pushed to leave the state and it is unfortunate because Illinois has a lot going for it, we have a diverse economy that has actually made tremendous strides to adapt to the post-industrial economy in the last few decades and we never lost our status as the transportation hub of the nation. People get fed up with constant tax increases without reforms.

We are also losing college students to other states due to the fiscal problems of the state affecting our public university system and this creates a domino effect. These universities stimulate the economies of the communities they are in including a number of college towns downstate and when the universities suffer the community suffers and when many of these students graduate they desire to take advantage of the many economic and cultural opportunities that our state offers, the Chicago area in particular remains a magnet for college educated Millennials but we are diluting our advantage by having a broken political system. So it is not so much I think Illinois is going down the drain but rather these issues are preventing us from living up to our potential.

I do think our broken political system that has resulted in some of the highest taxes in the country are part of the reason that some people feel pushed to leave the state and it is unfortunate because Illinois has a lot going for it, we have a diverse economy that has actually made tremendous strides to adapt to the post-industrial economy in the last few decades and we never lost our status as the transportation hub of the nation. People get fed up with constant tax increases without reforms.

We are also losing college students to other states due to the fiscal problems of the state affecting our public university system and this creates a domino effect. These universities stimulate the economies of the communities they are in including a number of college towns downstate and when the universities suffer the community suffers and when many of these students graduate they desire to take advantage of the many economic and cultural opportunities that our state offers, the Chicago area in particular remains a magnet for college educated Millennials but we are diluting our advantage by having a broken political system. So it is not so much I think Illinois is going down the drain but rather these issues are preventing us from living up to our potential.

High taxes on the middle class.

I am not an economist but you don't need to be to see the damage the the governor has brought to the state. As a public university graduate I would point to how much chaos and uncertainty that he has caused in our colleges and community colleges as a good example of how to scare people away from Illinois.

Unfortunately, there are a number of reasons for the mass exodus you see in Illinois. Taxes, Property valuation imbalances in Cook County, Crime & Safety in many of the underserved neighborhoods in Chicago, equal chronic unemployment in many of our urban and rural areas heavily populated by people of color, unfriendly business climate, and more. In my opinion, they are all equal contributors to our declining tax base which is robbing us of great citizens who would otherwise contribute to the revitalization of our State.

Unfortunately, there are a number of reasons for the mass exodus you see in Illinois. Taxes, Property valuation imbalances in Cook County, Crime & Safety in many of the underserved neighborhoods in Chicago, equal chronic unemployment in many of our urban and rural areas heavily populated by people of color, unfriendly business climate, and more. In my opinion, they are all equal contributors to our declining tax base which is robbing us of great citizens who would otherwise contribute to the revitalization of our State.

In my experience, teachers have been very willing to cooperate. They are generous public servants. When both sides come to the table with the intention to serve the needs of everyone, a win-win solution emerges. It is important to engage with a spirit of mutual benefit.

In the same years we have lost residents, states with warmer climates have gained residents. The impact of baby boomer retirees is felt throughout our economy. Meanwhile, manufacturing industry jobs have declined. Now we need to look at low environmental impact industries. Illinois will continue to lead in areas of technology, medicine, agriculture, finance, and environment and a balance will be achieved.

High taxes on the middle class.

Simply, the state of our politics make it difficult for residents to believe in the future of Illinois. The prolonged budget impasse is the tip of the iceberg of parties being unable to work together to come up with practical solutions.

I believe an overall frustration regarding the state's past and current policies are primary contributor to the exodus.

The cost of living and the lack of job opportunities contribute to the exodus as does factoring in the pension and budget crisis, crime rate and property tax inequities create a perfect storm scenario

I believe that people move for jobs, retirees for more spending power (and climate) and families for safety issues.

Disparity is the reason for this exodus. Disparity in access to resources and opportunity; disparity in access to fully-funded public education; disparity in the safety of communities; and disparity in the way Illinois has invested in the people of Illinois. If we want to keep people in Illinois, we need to invest in all our communities.

I believe Illinois must balance, stabilize its budget and reduce the backlog of unpaid bills. The budget impasse caused considerable harm to Illinois' image as a reliable place in which to do business. Financial institutions and companies doing business with the state found it very difficult to apply reasonable business principles in investment decision-making. There needs to be a clear signal supported by action that this will not be repeated. Property taxes need to be capped in some manner. There is a growing risk of families being property taxed out of the homes they have worked all their lives to own. I am specifically concerned about the risk of this in the 25th district. The combination of state and local tax increases is a threat to the stability of neighborhoods in the 25th and across the Chicago region.

The net loss of state residents is an important issue. To fully understand it and propose helpful solutions we would want to know the major elements in the equation: How many births in Illinois, how many deaths, how many moved in and how many moved out? And how they've shifted over time and how they compare with other states in our region, other large states, and throughout the country. Without knowing those important numbers, If we are just looking at those who move out of the state, I suspect the population decreases are from two groups . Younger people would be leaving for education and jobs; older people to retire to warmer climates and the lure of lower taxes.
From my conversations with older adults and families in my district, older adults who consider leaving for lower taxes are primarily focused on relieving their property tax burden. Talking to them, they are often comparing the high property tax on their 3-5 bedroom home in Skokie or Glenview with a much lower tax in a much smaller condo in Florida. Such savings could be accrued by downsizing in Illinois, but the external, non-tax, quality of life issues for older adults tips in favor of Florida or other sun-belt states.
I am troubled by reports that Illinois students are choosing colleges and universities in other states for their post-secondary education. It is far less likely that they will return to Illinois after graduation when they go elsewhere for college. It is not surprising that students and their families might choose an out-of-state school given the uncertainty from the budget impasse on the funding and teaching quality of our colleges and universities. Students applying to those colleges and universities have to be confident that the college and university will continue to offer a high- quality education until they graduate.

I don't know that there is any simple, one sole reason for Illinois' population. What I do know is that the manufactured budget crisis of the last 2+ years has caused irreversible, long-term damage to our schools, universities, infrastructure, healthcare system, social service net and business environment.

We are not small business friendly. We are not incentivizing our small business owners and allowing them the opportunity to create good paying jobs. We continue to create tax loopholes for large corporations but never do we create tax credits or incentives for small businesses to thrive and create employment. Once we begin to treat small business like they matter there will be more job opportunities allowing for families and businesses to thrive.

Irresponsible management by our governments (state, county, township, municipal) in their ability to oversee our finances and programs. Our tax system is unfair, our education system is not funded, our spending is neither transparent nor efficient, and our lawmakers are rewarded for incompetency. Taxes are too high, education is too expensive, and corruption is unchecked. I firmly blame Property Tax Brothers Mike Madigan, Jim Durkin, and Joe Berrios for the exodus of taxpayers from our state.

I believe the number one reason people are leaving was and is uncertainty regarding our long-term fiscal situation and the lack of confidence residents have in the ability of our leaders to change the trajectory of our state.

I don't know that there is any simple, one sole reason for Illinois' population. What I do know is that the manufactured budget crisis of the last 2+ years has caused irreversible, long-term damage to our schools, universities, infrastructure, healthcare system, social service net and business environment.

We are not small business friendly. We are not incentivizing our small business owners and allowing them the opportunity to create good paying jobs. We continue to create tax loopholes for large corporations but never do we create tax credits or incentives for small businesses to thrive and create employment. Once we begin to treat small business like they matter there will be more job opportunities allowing for families and businesses to thrive.

Irresponsible management by our governments (state, county, township, municipal) in their ability to oversee our finances and programs. Our tax system is unfair, our education system is not funded, our spending is neither transparent nor efficient, and our lawmakers are rewarded for incompetency. Taxes are too high, education is too expensive, and corruption is unchecked. I firmly blame Property Tax Brothers Mike Madigan, Jim Durkin, and Joe Berrios for the exodus of taxpayers from our state.

I believe the number one reason people are leaving was and is uncertainty regarding our long-term fiscal situation and the lack of confidence residents have in the ability of our leaders to change the trajectory of our state.

Loss in confidence of State Government. Rising taxes, loss of businesses, loss of jobs, loss of revenue to pay pensions are all reason for the citizens to be disgruntled with the elected officials. We need to restore the faith in Illinois and get Illinois working again.

High Property taxes.
High Income taxes.
Government corruption

While Illinois has seen overall population decline, the Chicago metropolitan area is robust and thriving. The vast majority of the population loss has been in areas in central, southern and western Illinois. The communities in these parts of the state have seen rapid decline due to a number of factors.

The advent of commercial farming has driven small farmers out of business. The loss of manufacturing throughout the midwest has caused job loss. Finally, compounding this decline is that many of these communities were for years propped up by government facilities. Some towns relied on penitentiaries, others on State Universities, and other state facilities. When Illinois began suffering financial difficulty due to increased pension obligations, state agencies faced large cuts, year after year. As an example, the Department of Natural Resources now employs roughly 20% of the staff that it needs to adequately maintain and preserve the state parks and facilities under its care. Those were solid government jobs that were lost and have never been replaced. Additionally, we made the same year over year cuts to social service providers and those cuts also resulted in the loss of jobs.

Without a diverse economy like the one in the Chicagoland area, these downstate communities were unable to provide opportunities for their residents and the decline hastened. This is why Illinois needs to look to find ways to encourage business and manufacturing growth, and reinvest in the public sector as a way stabilizing these communities.

Taxes, taxes, taxes!

While Illinois has seen overall population decline, the Chicago metropolitan area is robust and thriving. The vast majority of the population loss has been in areas in central, southern and western Illinois. The communities in these parts of the state have seen rapid decline due to a number of factors.

The advent of commercial farming has driven small farmers out of business. The loss of manufacturing throughout the midwest has caused job loss. Finally, compounding this decline is that many of these communities were for years propped up by government facilities. Some towns relied on penitentiaries, others on State Universities, and other state facilities. When Illinois began suffering financial difficulty due to increased pension obligations, state agencies faced large cuts, year after year. As an example, the Department of Natural Resources now employs roughly 20% of the staff that it needs to adequately maintain and preserve the state parks and facilities under its care. Those were solid government jobs that were lost and have never been replaced. Additionally, we made the same year over year cuts to social service providers and those cuts also resulted in the loss of jobs.

Without a diverse economy like the one in the Chicagoland area, these downstate communities were unable to provide opportunities for their residents and the decline hastened. This is why Illinois needs to look to find ways to encourage business and manufacturing growth, and reinvest in the public sector as a way stabilizing these communities.

Taxes, taxes, taxes!

I love Illinois and my neighbors and the people in the 42nd district do also, this State has many good attributes that cannot be dismissed. But many people see Illinois on the decline; expensive live in, shrinking opportunities and hostile to retire in.

Illinois has one of the worst out-migration problems in the country because state government is not friendly to taxpayers or employers. Illinois has the highest property taxes in the nation which fund our nearly 8,000 units of government, lawmakers recently raised taxes on Illinois families and small businesses, and we have regulations that are more cumbersome than our neighboring states. We are constantly being outcompeted by states across the country, and our jobs and population numbers prove it. We must fundamentally transform state government to ensure Illinois is a place where families and businesses feel welcome.

Illinois has one of the worst out-migration problems in the country because state government is not friendly to taxpayers or employers. Illinois has the highest property taxes in the nation which fund our nearly 8,000 units of government, lawmakers recently raised taxes on Illinois families and small businesses, and we have regulations that are more cumbersome than our neighboring states. We are constantly being outcompeted by states across the country, and our jobs and population numbers prove it. We must fundamentally transform state government to ensure Illinois is a place where families and businesses feel welcome.

Loss in confidence of State Government. Rising taxes, loss of businesses, loss of jobs, loss of revenue to pay pensions are all reason for the citizens to be disgruntled with the elected officials. We need to restore the faith in Illinois and get Illinois working again.

Rising income and property taxes are the largest factor. Not only the actual hikes that have already been felt, but the fear of additional hikes as the state's debt continues to climb contributes to this exodus.

High Property taxes.
High Income taxes.
Government corruption

I love Illinois and my neighbors and the people in the 42nd district do also, this State has many good attributes that cannot be dismissed. But many people see Illinois on the decline; expensive live in, shrinking opportunities and hostile to retire in.

Rising income and property taxes are the largest factor. Not only the actual hikes that have already been felt, but the fear of additional hikes as the state's debt continues to climb contributes to this exodus.

I have witnessed this sad trend from multiple perspectives. After I graduated from University of Illinois I saw my friends with great majors who did not want to stay in Illinois- in fact they didn't even look or apply to jobs in the state. This is one reason we continue to lose young talented recent graduates. I believe the reason is because residents are tired of being over-taxed and living in a state where the people they elect are not serving as their voice for change.

I have witnessed countless families who were born and raised in Illinois end up leaving because of the high property taxes pushing them out. These people leave for environments such as Texas, Florida, Tennessee, or South Carolina because of their economic savings and high opportunity for jobs (and maybe better weather). This is not an overnight trend, the state has been mismanaged for far too long. We cannot solve all of these issues immediately, but in order to give people faith that this is still a place to thrive we must ask more of our leaders.

Taxes. Speaking with residents in the 49th district, their main complaint is that property taxes are too high. Our families pay the one of the highest property tax rates in the nation. Property taxes are literally pricing people out of their homes, especially our senior population. Illinois loses 1 resident every 4.6 minutes to other states and millennials are leading the pack as they look elsewhere for better opportunities, lower taxes, and a more stable government.

I have witnessed this sad trend from multiple perspectives. After I graduated from University of Illinois I saw my friends with great majors who did not want to stay in Illinois- in fact they didn't even look or apply to jobs in the state. This is one reason we continue to lose young talented recent graduates. I believe the reason is because residents are tired of being over-taxed and living in a state where the people they elect are not serving as their voice for change.

I have witnessed countless families who were born and raised in Illinois end up leaving because of the high property taxes pushing them out. These people leave for environments such as Texas, Florida, Tennessee, or South Carolina because of their economic savings and high opportunity for jobs (and maybe better weather). This is not an overnight trend, the state has been mismanaged for far too long. We cannot solve all of these issues immediately, but in order to give people faith that this is still a place to thrive we must ask more of our leaders.

Taxes. Speaking with residents in the 49th district, their main complaint is that property taxes are too high. Our families pay the one of the highest property tax rates in the nation. Property taxes are literally pricing people out of their homes, especially our senior population. Illinois loses 1 resident every 4.6 minutes to other states and millennials are leading the pack as they look elsewhere for better opportunities, lower taxes, and a more stable government.

I believe people leave for a variety of reasons including high taxes, crime, job and business opportunities, weather and the state budget stalemate over the years.

Perception is reality to a lot of people. The perception that the state is in disarray is causing people to leave. We need to put forth a positive front and show that the state works.

I believe the dysfunction of state government, particularly these last two years when the state operated without a budget.

Perception is reality to a lot of people. The perception that the state is in disarray is causing people to leave. We need to put forth a positive front and show that the state works.

I believe the dysfunction of state government, particularly these last two years when the state operated without a budget.

In my opinion, the no. 1 reason is high property taxes. Illinois has the second highest property tax, and the highest median property tax in the nation.

In my opinion, the no. 1 reason is high property taxes. Illinois has the second highest property tax, and the highest median property tax in the nation.

I believe people leave for a variety of reasons including high taxes, crime, job and business opportunities, weather and the state budget stalemate over the years.

High tax burden on taxpayers. We have the highest property taxes in the nation and the government keeps increasing taxes on middle income families. A 2016 poll from the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois found that 47% of people wanted to leave Illinois and taxes was the number one reason (27%) they gave for wanting to leave.

Taxes are too high. Our personal property taxes have almost doubled since 2002. For people on a fixed income that's a deal breaker.

High tax burden on taxpayers. We have the highest property taxes in the nation and the government keeps increasing taxes on middle income families. A 2016 poll from the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois found that 47% of people wanted to leave Illinois and taxes was the number one reason (27%) they gave for wanting to leave.

The reason for the exodus is the state's dire fiscal situation and the lack of confidence people have in the government's ability to fix it.