Do you support a constitutional amendment favoring a graduated income tax? Please explain.

Budget

The fairest, simplest tax system is the flat tax, which is what we have now. If we go to a graduated tax, then the lobbyists will sneak in exemptions and deductions until our state tax code will look like the federal tax code.

No. A graduated income tax, especially given the state tax deduction limits under the new federal tax bill is not viable.

Yes. There is no other form of taxation that does not increase prices for goods and services used by those at the lower end of the income scale

Yes. Most states have such a tax. Those who make the most money using the facilities and services Illinois offers should help the most in maintaining, or even expanding, those facilities and services. Plus, it is much less burdensome on the wealthy to pay a higher percentage, than it is on those struggling at the lower end of the economic spectrum. As a matter of philosophy and economics, putting more money into the hands of the wealthy is not as good an investment as putting into the hands of the lower and middle classes. The wealthy will invest and spend a fair proportion of that money elsewhere, while the rest will, of necessity, be spending the money locally - a 100% return to the local economy. (And actually, when you consider that a dollar spent at a local grocery store will then get spent at a local shop, and then a local restaurant, etc. the return is actually much greater than 100%).

Perhaps if necessary. I am generally hesitant to amend the Constitution however and would hope that this tax could be carefully considered on its merits instead.

Speaking of! YES. As I mentioned above: new sources of revenue comes out of Illinois residents' pockets. I feel that we can balance a budget more effectively if we had a progressive tax plan. I support a graduated income tax because it is fair, right, and just. Those in poverty and our middle class needs relief.

Speaking of! YES. As I mentioned above: new sources of revenue comes out of Illinois residents' pockets. I feel that we can balance a budget more effectively if we had a progressive tax plan. I support a graduated income tax because it is fair, right, and just. Those in poverty and our middle class needs relief.

No I would not be in favor of a graduated income tax. I believe in a flat tax without exemptions or deductions. You simply pay tax based on what you have earned.

I do not support a graduated income tax. We should not penalize people for success, and we should encourage them to stay in Illinois and keep and build businesses here.

A graduated income tax will further our population loss. According to the Illinois Department of Revenue, this tax would result in the loss of 20,000 jobs, an additional net loss of 43,000 people added to the current net loss of 100,000 people per year, and a loss of $1.9 billion over the next four years. My focus as State Representative would be on reforming our failing systems to provide economic growth that leads to an improved qualities of life for families, better opportunities for job seekers, and fully funded core government services for our neighbors.

No. A graduated income tax will only serve to exacerbate the decline Illinois is already experiencing for two reasons. First, the businesses and individuals who would be taxed at the highest rate are the most mobile and therefore most able and inclined to leave the state, taking personal and business investment with them. Illinois' high tax and overreaching regulatory environment already has led to the highest net population loss in the country. Second, Illinois' political class has never been inclined to show spending discipline with the tax revenue they already have. As higher income earners and investors leave Illinois' economy because of the graduated tax, the door be will open to increasing rates on middle class families. The fact that Illinois' income tax is flat---albeit too high---is the only positive attribute of Illinois' tax and regulatory scheme.

No. I do not believe a graduated income tax is the most effective and fair method to tax Illinois residents. A tax plan that involves all residents based on a percentage of their income. For example, if you make $25K/year, and there is a 2% flat tax, your income tax would be $500. If you make $1M/year, your income tax would be $20,000.

Absolutely not

NO! The Illinois Department of Revenue is predicting that Illinois could lose up to 20,000 private sector jobs, 43,000 people, and $1.9 million in GDP if a graduated income tax becomes law.

I am opposed to a graduated income tax. We have enough revenue in Springfield and a graduated income tax will further the flight out of Illinois. Surrounding states have set the example. Even a solid blue state like New York is now offering tax incentives to try to lure business. Everyone seems to know the negative impact of taxation except the politicians in Springfield.

No. We don't need new ways to pass new taxes in Illinois. That's exactly the wrong focus.

I do not support any tax increase, including a graduated income tax. Studies show that such a tax would hit small businesses the hardest. Small businesses create jobs at rates greater than larger businesses and are key to turning our state around. Tax rates are a key factor in our state's out-migration problem and any type of tax increase would only exacerbate it.

I can only say that I am committed to a tax structure that is fair and just, and one that promotes all Illinois citizens to have some skin in the game.

Eliminating the regressive tax structures and increasing the flat tax might be more palatable than a graduated income tax for everyone across the income levels. I support the abolition of taxes that disproportionately burden the poor and middle class. A better and fair way to collect revenue in Illinois is from an increased but flat income tax. Taxpayers are likely to feel that something is being taken from them if they are asked to pay a higher percentage. The highest income-earners, however, are currently the people who are favored and who pay the smallest percentage in taxes. If we were to remove all of the other taxes and simply have a flat tax for state and federal systems without deductions or other taxes, we would see an enormous savings and less hostility between interest groups.

No, I do not. A graduated income tax will contribute to the state's net out migration and hurt Illinois' small businesses.

I do not support a constitutional amendment favoring a graduated tax income. I was not in support of the permanent increase of 32% in July and support a repeal of that increase. A graduated income tax increase is not the answer to fixing budgetary issues. Lets begin with calling this tax what it is. It is a progressive tax. A progressive tax will force more of our companies and individuals out of our state, only causing more of the exodus that we are currently dealing with. Currently Illinois receives the largest amount of taxes from those making between $100k-500k a year, which is only 18% of Illinois taxpayers. This group of earners shell out 41% of all income taxes paid in Illinois. It is fiscally irresponsible and morally wrong to make the top 19% pay 64% of all the income taxes in the state of Illinois, and then attempt to introduce a constitutional amendment to take more. No more taxes. We need to start living within our means and reward people for their success.

Absolutely not. The graduated income tax is a bad idea and it will kill the Illinois economy. The last thing we need is to penalize people for making money.

I do not support a graduated income tax. More tax hikes on Illinois families and businesses will only make our problems worse

Generally, yes, but I worry it may scare people out of Illinois. My final decision depends on what the ranges and rates of this graduated or progressive income tax will be. Ultimately, I would base my vote on what the people of the 8th Legislative district direct because a constitutional amendment or a constitutional convention (it is the bicentennial anniversary of Illinois' statehood) would require either three-fifths of those voting on the question or a majority of those voting in the election (See Article XIV of the current Illinois Constitution of 1970).

Yes, I support a Constitutional Amendment to implement a graduated income tax system. I was a co-sponsor of SJRCA 0001 which would begin the process. Illinois needs to establish a more equitable system of taxation. High sales, property taxes and our flat tax are regressive. However, if a graduated income tax is enacted (may take years), there should be an accompanying reduction or freeze of property taxes.

Yes, I support a constitutional amendment favoring a graduated income tax. Illinois has one of the most regressive tax structures in the country, which has been extremely damaging to working families in this state. However, this is not solely because of the state's income tax structure, it is also related to high sales tax, fees, etc. We need to have a system where those who have more, pay more, and those that have less, pay less.

Yes. A graduated income tax is needed to bring in revenue in order to bridge the gap in our budget deficit. It is also fundamentally fairer, and better economic policy to tax higher-income individuals, who save more of their income, at a higher rate than lower-income individuals, who spend a far greater percentage of their income in the local economy. A constitutional amendment favoring a graduated income tax is one necessary step toward addressing Illinois's structural budget problems.

Yes. The flat tax required by our current constitution is obsolete and not suited to a modern economy. It's also unfair to those on the lowest rungs of the income ladder. Most states and the federal government have a graduated income tax for this reason, and much of Illinois' current fiscal problems are due to the fact that our flat tax rate was kept so low (among the lowest in the nation) for so long while the state was not making its pension payments and the very wealthy in this state were not paying their fair share.

Yes. As the vast majority of states already recognize, you cannot sustain world-class infrastructure and education and provide for other needs on a flat income tax structure. Illinois is one of only eight states with a flat tax; 34 states, including the District of Columbia, have a graduated income tax. Implementing a graduated income tax would not place Illinois at a competitive disadvantage compared to neighboring states. Although Indiana and Michigan have flat state income tax rates, counties or municipalities are allowed to assess a separate income tax in addition to the state tax. Wisconsin, Iowa, Missouri, and Minnesota already have graduated income tax rates.

Pay it! Then determine what reforms need to take place.

Education Degree in Finance, University of Illinois
Occupation Vice President, R.P. Lumber
Home Edwardsville
Past Political/Civic Experience Chairman, Madison County Republican Party

IL levies a flat income tax at a current rate of 4.95%. Our flat rate tax is an anachronism in today's world. We are one of only seven states that do this. I believe that our society overwhelmingly agrees with the idea that the very wealthy should pay taxes at a higher rate than those people who are not as wealthy. I believe that progressive taxation is just, and as an aside I want to point out that until the recent change in federal tax law that has capped the deductibility of state income taxes paid, our flat rate tax was actually a regressive one (since the wealthy got a larger federal deduction and were therefore actually paying a lower effective state tax rate)!

The proposal that I would propose would be to keep tax rates where they are right now for people making less than $500,000 per year. Above that amount the rate would increase to 7%, and then it would increase further to 8.5% for incomes over one million dollars. This proposal would hopefully result in about an additional two billion dollars for the state, which again I would want to go straight to the pension funds until they are adequately funded.

The major problem, of course, is that our state constitution requires the flat tax rate. In order to amend the constitution to allow the progressive income tax it must first pass in the State Legislature, and then be submitted to the electorate for their approval at an election. I will work tirelessly to get it passed in Springfield and then at the ballot box. I pledge to be its strongest advocate in the Senate. The other Senators will probably tire of my efforts on its behalf, but I must do this as I believe that addressing the debt in this way is absolutely crucial in order to protect our state. It will undoubtedly be a struggle as the Koch Brothers and their ilk will certainly mobilize against it. However, I am convinced that if we can get it out of Springfield the voters will approve it overwhelmingly.

I am in favor of a graduated income tax. I believe in the principle that those who earn more should pay more in taxes. There are 33 other states and the District of Columbia who have a progressive income tax. I believe this is the right thing to do for our state both ethically and financially. If we are looking at any increased taxes in the future, it has to be on those who can afford it.

Education Person Senior HS, Roxboro, NC 1982 Asbury University, Wilmore, KY, BS Physical Education,1986 University of Kentucky, Lexington, MS Sports Adm. 1989 University of Kentucky, Lexington, EdD Adapted PE, Kinesiology 1995
Occupation Head Mens Basketball Coach/Professor Greenville University
Home Greenville
Past Political/Civic Experience None

I can not answer that until I get elected. I talk not with the leadership of the state Senate, but the people. If sent to Springfield by the good people I will cast a vote for what the people think, not what I think. I will not represent the party interest like the current elected politicians.

Yes. The income tax should reflect citizen's ability to pay. A graduated income tax is the fairest, least-regressive way to impose a tax.

Yes. The income tax should reflect citizen's ability to pay. A graduated income tax is the fairest, least-regressive way to impose a tax.

Yes, as stated. There are only 10 states in the country that still use flat taxes when there is enormous diversity in the income profiles of Americans. There's no reason that a bit more can be asked of those who have been fortunate in life and can afford to help their fellow Illinois citizens.

I support fair revenue policies in which those who have more pay more for the services that benefit everyone. The best example of these policies is the fair graduated income tax. I have been an advocate for the Fair Tax for many years. As the Deputy Director at Community Renewal Society, we actively worked to get a constitutional amendment for the fair tax on the ballot in the spring 2016 legislative session.

I believe a fair, graduated income tax is one of the key ways Illinois can get on track to balancing its budgets and meeting its obligations without cutting vital programs and services the residents of Illinois need to thrive. Thirty-four states and the federal government all have progressive income taxes that ask those who have more to pay higher rates. Polls have shown that most Illinoisans favor a graduated income tax. It is time for state legislators to allow the residents of the state of Illinois to weigh in on a constitutional amendment to eliminate our flat tax and enact a graduated income tax.

Yes. The current flat tax structure is unfair to the majority of Illinois taxpayers. Additionally, the state should have the flexibility to design a stable tax structure that lowers tax rates for those with lower incomes while raising rates for those at higher incomes. Illinois is one of only 8 states with an income tax that does not have a graduated rate structure. The current system is regressive and imposes tax burdens on middle class and working families that make no sense. Middle-class and working-class families have seen their wages stagnate while upper-income families continue to see wage growth. This means that as a policy matter, and under Illinois' current constitution, we are prevented from adjusting our tax base according to where growth is actually occurring. Smart tax policy should look to capture revenue where the economy is expanding, not where it's contracting or remaining stagnant. This is also true for sales taxes on services.

The nonpartisan Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy ranks Illinois as the 5th most unfair state when it comes to how our tax burden is distributed. We rely on highly regressive sales taxes and property taxes, and with our flat income tax the top 1% actually end up paying a lower percentage in state and local taxes than the bottom 20%. The problem in Illinois is not the total tax burden, but that we place too much of the burden on working class families. A progressive income tax is a crucial step to making our tax system fair.

Yes, because everyone should pay an equitable share.

No response provided

Yes, because everyone should pay an equitable share.

Yes, because everyone should pay an equitable share.

Candidate did not respond

Strongly, yes. The flat tax system is just poor public policy. Most of both red and blue states have graduated income taxes. The Republican-controlled federal government just overhauled the tax system, and never once considered scrapping the graduated system. It simply makes more sense and generates more revenue. And unlike inherently regressive levies like the sales tax, a graduated income tax could increase state revenue without increasing the burden on lower and middle-class families.

Yes, I do. The state income tax system as it is set up now hurts working and middle- class families the most. Other states have a graduated income tax system and it works for them and some such states are in much better fiscal shape than we are. I think with a constitutional amendment that allows for a graduated income tax we can come up with a tax plan that balances the needs of working and middle-class families and ensure that our most wealthy citizens pay their fair share. A flat tax mandated by the state constitution only ties our hands as far as coming up with innovative solutions.

Yes, I do. The state income tax system as it is set up now hurts working and middle- class families the most. Other states have a graduated income tax system and it works for them and some such states are in much better fiscal shape than we are. I think with a constitutional amendment that allows for a graduated income tax we can come up with a tax plan that balances the needs of working and middle-class families and ensure that our most wealthy citizens pay their fair share. A flat tax mandated by the state constitution only ties our hands as far as coming up with innovative solutions.

This amendment has not gained enough support from voters and legislators in the past. Many people are wary of amending our constitution. A graduated income tax could benefit average taxpayers, however it would have to be structured fairly for all.

I would have to study this issue more to ensure it didn't hurt middle class workers in any way.

I am going to wait until next year to fully answer the graduated income tax issue until I complete my review and wait until the 2018 tax filing season has completed to properly and responsibly assess the impact of the new Federal Tax Code recently passed by the Republicans so that I can determine the impact on our taxpayers, residents and businesses first. This way I will be able to make a responsible determination whether or not our citizens here in Illinois have been materially harmed or not, because if the fiscal reforms being sought by the Trump Administration result in increased job creation (specifically in the tech and manufacturing sectors) in Illinois then hopefully we'll see a rise in incomes at the lower and middle class economic brackets where a graduated income tax may at that point be an adverse impact on those very same middle income residents who were trying to help.

I am going to wait until next year to fully answer the graduated income tax issue until I complete my review and wait until the 2018 tax filing season has completed to properly and responsibly assess the impact of the new Federal Tax Code recently passed by the Republicans so that I can determine the impact on our taxpayers, residents and businesses first. This way I will be able to make a responsible determination whether or not our citizens here in Illinois have been materially harmed or not, because if the fiscal reforms being sought by the Trump Administration result in increased job creation (specifically in the tech and manufacturing sectors) in Illinois then hopefully we'll see a rise in incomes at the lower and middle class economic brackets where a graduated income tax may at that point be an adverse impact on those very same middle income residents who were trying to help.

Yes a graduated income tax will generate more revenue into the state at a fair rate, that potentially assist with the underfunding of schools especially in low income and impoverished neighborhoods.

Yes a graduated income tax will generate more revenue into the state at a fair rate, that potentially assist with the underfunding of schools especially in low income and impoverished neighborhoods.

Yes, I do favor such amendment. In the event that it is not possible to pass such an amendment I would favor increasing the state rate and increasing offsetting tax credits for lower income taxpayers

If a graduated income tax is utilized by the Federal government, it should be a utilized scale/model for the state of Illinois, so, yes, I support this.

Yes, I favor a constitutional amendment that favors a graduated income tax which I believe is a fairer and more efficient way to help eliminate the debt

I would support an alternative to the state's current flat tax. Any alternative to the current flat tax would require a constitutional amendment.

Absolutely. Illinois is one of only six states without a graduated income tax. A flat tax is unfairly regressive, placing a disproportionate burden on the working and middle class. While a constitutional amendment should be the first priority, several states have proposed interesting alternative approaches in order to work around the new federal cap on state and local tax deductions. These approaches, include allowing individuals to "donate" money to state coffers (meeting the requirements for charitable donations which remain tax deductible) or repealing the state income tax entirely and replacing it with a graduated payroll tax paid by employers. Either of these arrangements would be fully deductible and allow for progressive taxation without a constitutional amendment, and are worth exploring.

While I am open to considering this idea, I am at present undecided and not persuaded about the long-term benefits of a graduated income tax.

Yes. One of the questions I hear most frequently from voters is how can we address Illinois' budget deficit. The current administration and past governors have made substantial reductions in state spending. We cannot cut our way out of the current budgetary morass. The Illinois constitution currently restricts the legislature from imposing a graduated income tax. I believe that a graduated income tax, among other tax increases listed above, is necessary to stabilize state revenues. The graduated income tax allows for rates to be set so that working and lower middle-class families could have rates lower than they are today, while those with higher incomes would pay higher rates. This notion of fairness is not universally appreciated. But it is the cornerstone of the federal government's income tax, which consumes a larger share of the taxes we pay and is common in most states in the country, including neighbors on all sides of Illinois.
Unless we can increase and stabilize the revenues without further burdening the middle class and working families, we will not be able to meet the needs of the people and businesses of the State of Illinois and move ourselves toward a brighter future. Illinois' location on Lake Michigan, in the middle of the nation's air and ground transportation hubs offers a huge potential for economic growth. But we have to stabilize our state budget for that potential to be realized. A graduated income tax bringing in several additional billions of dollars a year is a keystone in my plan to bring Illinois out of the quicksand and offer its residents the opportunity to thrive educationally, socially and economically. Without it our potential is being squandered.

Yes. One of the questions I hear most frequently from voters is how can we address Illinois' budget deficit. The current administration and past governors have made substantial reductions in state spending. We cannot cut our way out of the current budgetary morass. The Illinois constitution currently restricts the legislature from imposing a graduated income tax. I believe that a graduated income tax, among other tax increases listed above, is necessary to stabilize state revenues. The graduated income tax allows for rates to be set so that working and lower middle-class families could have rates lower than they are today, while those with higher incomes would pay higher rates. This notion of fairness is not universally appreciated. But it is the cornerstone of the federal government's income tax, which consumes a larger share of the taxes we pay and is common in most states in the country, including neighbors on all sides of Illinois.
Unless we can increase and stabilize the revenues without further burdening the middle class and working families, we will not be able to meet the needs of the people and businesses of the State of Illinois and move ourselves toward a brighter future. Illinois' location on Lake Michigan, in the middle of the nation's air and ground transportation hubs offers a huge potential for economic growth. But we have to stabilize our state budget for that potential to be realized. A graduated income tax bringing in several additional billions of dollars a year is a keystone in my plan to bring Illinois out of the quicksand and offer its residents the opportunity to thrive educationally, socially and economically. Without it our potential is being squandered.

Yes. I support a progressive income tax to ensure millionaires and billionaires are paying their fair share, while giving low and middle-income earners a break.

Yes. I support a progressive income tax to ensure millionaires and billionaires are paying their fair share, while giving low and middle-income earners a break.

Yes, I support progressive taxes to raise the revenue our state so desperately needs from those who can afford to contribute more.

Yes, I support progressive taxes to raise the revenue our state so desperately needs from those who can afford to contribute more.

Yes. Illinois is one of only four states in the U.S. with a constitutionally mandated flat tax. This forces middle class individuals and families in Illinois to pay a disproportionate amount into the tax system, while not asking those who make more to pay more. This simply does not make sense. We need fair tax reform in Illinois that is progressive and not regressive. Ultimately, we must shift the balance of revenue sources, so that property tax revenue is not the dominant source of funding for critical priorities like public education, which the state is dramatically under-funding.

Yes. Illinois is one of only four states in the U.S. with a constitutionally mandated flat tax. This forces middle class individuals and families in Illinois to pay a disproportionate amount into the tax system, while not asking those who make more to pay more. This simply does not make sense. We need fair tax reform in Illinois that is progressive and not regressive. Ultimately, we must shift the balance of revenue sources, so that property tax revenue is not the dominant source of funding for critical priorities like public education, which the state is dramatically under-funding.

No. It's just smoke and mirrors for another tax increase and not just for the "rich". Our leadership is the same leadership who more than doubled our spending and increased our taxes by 67% from 2003 to 2014. Their definition of "rich" would likely move frequently and include a large portion of the middle class.

No. I believe effective and sustainable reforms should be the starting point towards fixing Illinois' fiscal problems. Pension reform is top on my list in that wise.

Yes. I have been a supporter of graduated income tax rates since taking office in 2013. Last year I filed HB3522. This bill would put in place the same income tax rates as Wisconsin, with a highest rate of 7.65% on income above $250,000 per year. The revenue from this increase would be used to restructure the way that we spend money and deal with our debt as a means of guiding Illinois back towards fiscal stability and making us more competitive with our neighbors.

The bill would immediately dedicate substantially more funding for K-12 education which would help us achieve our goal of equitable education. However, a large portion of that funding would be placed into a fund designed to replace existing local revenues, by requiring that school districts reduce their levy by $1 for every dollar they take out of this fund. This would help relieve the burden on (and lower) local property tax bills and shift funding to state revenues. High property taxes are the biggest cost to businesses in Illinois (far higher than corporate income taxes), so reducing local property taxes will immediately improve the bottom line of every business in Illinois.

The bill also calls for dedicating an additional $1 Billion in pension payments, in order to reduce the burden of our unfunded liability. This would save the state money by improving bond ratings and making it cheaper to borrow money. The bill further calls for a reduction in the state sales tax, which is both regressive in nature and a burden on businesses. This reduction would lower the overall cost of goods and make our border communities more competitive.

Finally, the bill calls for a new investment into human services programs that are proven good investments. During the Rauner administration we have made senseless cuts to programs that are proven to save the state money (teen reach, after school matters, Adult Redeploy, etc.) Cuts to these programs cost the state more in the long run than we save in the short run. This sort of short term thinking is exactly what has led to our financial problems. As such, I intend to increase investment into programming that has proven results in order to better improve the financial condition of Illinois sooner. The sooner our debts are paid and our financial condition improves, the sooner we can responsibly consider decreasing taxes.

We just absorbed a massive 32% income tax increase. Illinois is still falling million of dollars deeper in the hole every week. A graduated income tax without definitions of what the new graduated tax brackets are would be wrong. I am against new taxes and believe we must pass a budget staying within our means.

No. A graduated income tax penalizes high earners; the same earners who start small businesses and create jobs.

Yes. I have been a supporter of graduated income tax rates since taking office in 2013. Last year I filed HB3522. This bill would put in place the same income tax rates as Wisconsin, with a highest rate of 7.65% on income above $250,000 per year. The revenue from this increase would be used to restructure the way that we spend money and deal with our debt as a means of guiding Illinois back towards fiscal stability and making us more competitive with our neighbors.

The bill would immediately dedicate substantially more funding for K-12 education which would help us achieve our goal of equitable education. However, a large portion of that funding would be placed into a fund designed to replace existing local revenues, by requiring that school districts reduce their levy by $1 for every dollar they take out of this fund. This would help relieve the burden on (and lower) local property tax bills and shift funding to state revenues. High property taxes are the biggest cost to businesses in Illinois (far higher than corporate income taxes), so reducing local property taxes will immediately improve the bottom line of every business in Illinois.

The bill also calls for dedicating an additional $1 Billion in pension payments, in order to reduce the burden of our unfunded liability. This would save the state money by improving bond ratings and making it cheaper to borrow money. The bill further calls for a reduction in the state sales tax, which is both regressive in nature and a burden on businesses. This reduction would lower the overall cost of goods and make our border communities more competitive.

Finally, the bill calls for a new investment into human services programs that are proven good investments. During the Rauner administration we have made senseless cuts to programs that are proven to save the state money (teen reach, after school matters, Adult Redeploy, etc.) Cuts to these programs cost the state more in the long run than we save in the short run. This sort of short term thinking is exactly what has led to our financial problems. As such, I intend to increase investment into programming that has proven results in order to better improve the financial condition of Illinois sooner. The sooner our debts are paid and our financial condition improves, the sooner we can responsibly consider decreasing taxes.

No. It's just smoke and mirrors for another tax increase and not just for the "rich". Our leadership is the same leadership who more than doubled our spending and increased our taxes by 67% from 2003 to 2014. Their definition of "rich" would likely move frequently and include a large portion of the middle class.

I do not support any proposal that would increase taxes, such as a graduated income tax. New taxes would only further increase the exodus of jobs and families out of Illinois, making it more difficult to get our state's finances back on track.

We just absorbed a massive 32% income tax increase. Illinois is still falling million of dollars deeper in the hole every week. A graduated income tax without definitions of what the new graduated tax brackets are would be wrong. I am against new taxes and believe we must pass a budget staying within our means.

No. The sate is experiencing out migration now. A graduated income tax would only add to the negative perception that Illinois is not the best place to live, work or build a business. The people who would be subject to higher graduated taxes are the same people who build, innovate and employ people and reinvest in their businesses. This area does not need anymore disincentive to prosper in Illinois.

No. A graduated income tax penalizes high earners; the same earners who start small businesses and create jobs.

I do not support any proposal that would increase taxes, such as a graduated income tax. New taxes would only further increase the exodus of jobs and families out of Illinois, making it more difficult to get our state's finances back on track.

No. This would be a disaster. This would send more of our tax base to other states. I favor a responsible approach in addressing State spending and reduce the taxes on our residents.

No. The sate is experiencing out migration now. A graduated income tax would only add to the negative perception that Illinois is not the best place to live, work or build a business. The people who would be subject to higher graduated taxes are the same people who build, innovate and employ people and reinvest in their businesses. This area does not need anymore disincentive to prosper in Illinois.

No. This would be a disaster. This would send more of our tax base to other states. I favor a responsible approach in addressing State spending and reduce the taxes on our residents.

Yes, I support a constitutional amendment favoring a graduated income tax because it would bring fairer and more equitable taxation to the people of Illinois. It would mitigate some of the tax burden on the average citizen.

No. The flat tax rate that is in place currently is the fairest way to collect income tax. When the graduated income tax was brought forth in 2013, I led the effort on the DuPage County Board to pass a resolution opposing the graduated income tax because of how detrimental it would be to taxpayers and economic development. This is not a rich man's tax; it is an everyone's tax. The previous proposal called for a person who earns 18,000 a year to have a tax increase. Hardworking taxpayers of Illinois can't afford anymore tax increases! A graduated income tax would also destroy job creation and further incentivize business to flee to neighboring states.

No. I do not support a graduated income tax over a flat tax. I believe that it would actually have an adverse effect on economic development and growth in the long run. Suppressing this type of growth would be a negative outcome of the proposed constitutional amendment. I believe making arbitrary new brackets is also a slippery slope. The residents that I have spoken to are willing to pay a fair share for services provided as long as it is equitable for all. For these reasons I support the simplified flat tax.

No. The flat tax rate that is in place currently is the fairest way to collect income tax. When the graduated income tax was brought forth in 2013, I led the effort on the DuPage County Board to pass a resolution opposing the graduated income tax because of how detrimental it would be to taxpayers and economic development. This is not a rich man's tax; it is an everyone's tax. The previous proposal called for a person who earns 18,000 a year to have a tax increase. Hardworking taxpayers of Illinois can't afford anymore tax increases! A graduated income tax would also destroy job creation and further incentivize business to flee to neighboring states.

No. I believe effective and sustainable reforms should be the starting point towards fixing Illinois' fiscal problems. Pension reform is top on my list in that wise.

Yes, Illinois needs a graduated rate income tax system that increases the tax rate on Illinois residents who can afford to pay more. It is a more efficient tax and would put Illinois on the pathway to financial stability.

Yes, I support a constitutional amendment favoring a graduated income tax because it would bring fairer and more equitable taxation to the people of Illinois. It would mitigate some of the tax burden on the average citizen.

Yes, I believe the more you make, you have the ability to pay more. I've been blessed with my place in life (not rich by any stretch), and I would not mind paying a little more in taxes. We shouldn't burden the people who make more with a higher rate. I've traveled the world and see how government works in other countries, and we have a good thing here. Government needs revenue to operate and provide a social safety net and to opperate.

Yes, I believe the more you make, you have the ability to pay more. I've been blessed with my place in life (not rich by any stretch), and I would not mind paying a little more in taxes. We shouldn't burden the people who make more with a higher rate. I've traveled the world and see how government works in other countries, and we have a good thing here. Government needs revenue to operate and provide a social safety net and to opperate.

Yes, Illinois needs a graduated rate income tax system that increases the tax rate on Illinois residents who can afford to pay more. It is a more efficient tax and would put Illinois on the pathway to financial stability.

No. A graduated income tax hike ends up hurting Middle income families like my own. Just look at Wisconsin where the second highest tax bracket of 6.27% starts at $22,400. That is higher than Illinois' flat rate, even after the largest tax hike in state history that was passed this summer by Democrats and Republicans. As we see in our neighboring states, a graduated tax opens the door for higher taxes which may initially impact only high earners but will eventually be expanded downward to force middle income and low income families to pay more. The politicians have proven they aren't interested in spending our money wisely, and they are already hammering our families with higher taxes. Our flat income taxes is one of the final protections we have from continued tax increases.

I most certainly support a constitutional amendment favoring a graduated income tax! The flat tax we have now hurts low income people disproportionately.

No. A graduated income tax hike ends up hurting Middle income families like my own. Just look at Wisconsin where the second highest tax bracket of 6.27% starts at $22,400. That is higher than Illinois' flat rate, even after the largest tax hike in state history that was passed this summer by Democrats and Republicans. As we see in our neighboring states, a graduated tax opens the door for higher taxes which may initially impact only high earners but will eventually be expanded downward to force middle income and low income families to pay more. The politicians have proven they aren't interested in spending our money wisely, and they are already hammering our families with higher taxes. Our flat income taxes is one of the final protections we have from continued tax increases.

I do support amending the constitution to allow for a graduated income tax: I don't believe that the legislature should be limited to only one income tax rate. Amending the constitution in this way simply provides more flexibility for future legislatures to determine the best, and fairest, tax rates. It does not necessarily mean a tax increase.