Where do you stand on a graduated income tax?

Budget

I do not support a graduated income tax. It will not fix our budget deficit, but it will make job creation more difficult, which in turn pushes tax revenues even lower.

I believe that we must enact a graduated income tax in Illinois. Our current tax system lets the wealthy off the hook while asking middle-class and working families to pay more, and is a poor fit for the modern economy, which has seen almost all income growth go to the very top. Illinois is one of only a few states in the nation with a flat income tax and while opponents of the change argue that it would harm our competitiveness, most of our neighboring states already have progressive tax structures and have seen economic growth while also raising revenue to fund key programs.

I do not support a graduated income tax. It will not fix our budget deficit, but it will make job creation more difficult, which in turn pushes tax revenues even lower.

I strongly and unequivocally oppose a graduated tax structure. The many failed policies of this state — high taxes among them — have already led to a major erosion of our tax base. More than 600,000 net Illinoisans have fled to other states since 2010, according to the IRS. All those residents have taken billions in income with them, draining the state's tax base. The IRS data also shows that Illinois is bleeding its more-productive residents.

The incomes of those that left the state in 2014 were, on average, $20,000 higher compared to those coming into the state. Chicago topped the list of US cities that millionaires are fleeing. Those with the most wealth also have the most ability to relocate. Furthermore, Illinois has higher property tax burden than every other state with no income tax which implies that our government costs are the problem and not our income tax structure. Illinois' flat income tax structure is the one bright spot in a terribly burdensome tax code. Illinois needs to welcome its entrepreneurs, small business owners and job creators, not punish them even more.

Illinois needs to replace its regressive flat income tax with a progressive income tax to ensure we are able to improve funding for schools that have been left behind, lower our regressive property tax rates, and protect the middle class and those striving to get there. I also support legalizing and taxing recreational use of marijuana, which is estimated to help generate as much as $700 million a year for the state.

Unlike my five opponents, I oppose the graduated income tax and in fact oppose any increases in any new taxes - the flat income tax, corporate taxes or graduated income tax. I would be in favor of finding new sources of taxes. The best source would be legalizing marijuana throughout the state and the second best would be casino gambling in Chicago.

I support a progressive income tax. The problem we face is constitutionally it would take years to enact progressive rates for our income tax. We need to enact that reform, including using tax credits and deductions to more quickly make our income tax a fairer and more progressive model.

I support a Graduated Tax system. there should be a scale from 1-10 percent. People earning less than $50,000 per yr should only pay between 1-3%, people earning more than $50,000 per yr should pay 4%, and people earning $100,000 should pay 5% and people earning more than $250,000 to $1 million should pay between 6-10%. This should work for everybody in Illinois. The wealthy should pay their fair share of taxes.

I'm for it. In Illinois, the overall burden of state and local taxes falls disproportionately on lower-income households. Illinois has the fifth-most regressive state and local tax structure in the nation, according to the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (https://itep.org/whopays/#). In Illinois, the poorest 20 percent pay 13.2 percent of their income in state and local taxes. The middle 60 percent pay 10.9 percent of their income in state and local taxes. The wealthiest 1 percent pay 4.6 of their income in state and local taxes. Illinois does not, in effect, have a flat tax. When you include sales tax, motor fuel taxes, taxes on tobacco and alcohol along with property tax and local taxes, such as the late and not lamented Cook County soda tax, we have a system that heavily taxes the poor, while leaving the wealthy relatively unscathed. My proposal is for an income tax structure as follows: Income up to $24,999 - 1 percent; Income from $25,000 to $44,999 - 2.25 percent; Income from $45,000 to $149,999 - 3.75 percent; Income from $150,000 to $999,999 - 4.95 percent; Income over $1 million - 6 percen. I would also include retirement income as part of a taxpayer's taxable income. A graduated income tax, of course, requires a constitutional amendment. It won't be easy to achieve, but it's an idea that's generally popular, and I will fight for it as a priority, whereas other candidates for governor might not.

I strongly and unequivocally oppose a graduated tax structure. The many failed policies of this state — high taxes among them — have already led to a major erosion of our tax base. More than 600,000 net Illinoisans have fled to other states since 2010, according to the IRS. All those residents have taken billions in income with them, draining the state's tax base. The IRS data also shows that Illinois is bleeding its more-productive residents.

The incomes of those that left the state in 2014 were, on average, $20,000 higher compared to those coming into the state. Chicago topped the list of US cities that millionaires are fleeing. Those with the most wealth also have the most ability to relocate. Furthermore, Illinois has higher property tax burden than every other state with no income tax which implies that our government costs are the problem and not our income tax structure. Illinois' flat income tax structure is the one bright spot in a terribly burdensome tax code. Illinois needs to welcome its entrepreneurs, small business owners and job creators, not punish them even more.

Illinois needs to replace its regressive flat income tax with a progressive income tax to ensure we are able to improve funding for schools that have been left behind, lower our regressive property tax rates, and protect the middle class and those striving to get there. I also support legalizing and taxing recreational use of marijuana, which is estimated to help generate as much as $700 million a year for the state.

Unlike my five opponents, I oppose the graduated income tax and in fact oppose any increases in any new taxes - the flat income tax, corporate taxes or graduated income tax. I would be in favor of finding new sources of taxes. The best source would be legalizing marijuana throughout the state and the second best would be casino gambling in Chicago.

I support a progressive income tax. The problem we face is constitutionally it would take years to enact progressive rates for our income tax. We need to enact that reform, including using tax credits and deductions to more quickly make our income tax a fairer and more progressive model.

I support a Graduated Tax system. there should be a scale from 1-10 percent. People earning less than $50,000 per yr should only pay between 1-3%, people earning more than $50,000 per yr should pay 4%, and people earning $100,000 should pay 5% and people earning more than $250,000 to $1 million should pay between 6-10%. This should work for everybody in Illinois. The wealthy should pay their fair share of taxes.

I'm for it. In Illinois, the overall burden of state and local taxes falls disproportionately on lower-income households. Illinois has the fifth-most regressive state and local tax structure in the nation, according to the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (https://itep.org/whopays/#). In Illinois, the poorest 20 percent pay 13.2 percent of their income in state and local taxes. The middle 60 percent pay 10.9 percent of their income in state and local taxes. The wealthiest 1 percent pay 4.6 of their income in state and local taxes. Illinois does not, in effect, have a flat tax. When you include sales tax, motor fuel taxes, taxes on tobacco and alcohol along with property tax and local taxes, such as the late and not lamented Cook County soda tax, we have a system that heavily taxes the poor, while leaving the wealthy relatively unscathed. My proposal is for an income tax structure as follows: Income up to $24,999 - 1 percent; Income from $25,000 to $44,999 - 2.25 percent; Income from $45,000 to $149,999 - 3.75 percent; Income from $150,000 to $999,999 - 4.95 percent; Income over $1 million - 6 percen. I would also include retirement income as part of a taxpayer's taxable income. A graduated income tax, of course, requires a constitutional amendment. It won't be easy to achieve, but it's an idea that's generally popular, and I will fight for it as a priority, whereas other candidates for governor might not.

I believe that we must enact a graduated income tax in Illinois. Our current tax system lets the wealthy off the hook while asking middle-class and working families to pay more, and is a poor fit for the modern economy, which has seen almost all income growth go to the very top. Illinois is one of only a few states in the nation with a flat income tax and while opponents of the change argue that it would harm our competitiveness, most of our neighboring states already have progressive tax structures and have seen economic growth while also raising revenue to fund key programs.