Do you support re-allocating police services from low-crime to high-crime neighborhoods?

Criminal Justice Reform

Yes

yes

no For the most part low crime areas has less violent crimes. To the person in low crime
neighborhoods crime is crime but there is a big difference. I do support increasing the police force.
I think they are under manned and over worked.

NO

As long as 1,000 new officers are hired, and baselines of coverage are established so as not to
canibalize the current safer parts of the city.

Yes

Chevette A. Valentine IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

Yes

I support high-crime neighborhoods having the support they need. However, in the 19th District,
which is a relatively low-crime neighborhood, the 25% cut in police over the past four years has
resulted in spikes in crime, including violent crime. I believe we need additional police resources
in the 19th District and across the city.

As long as 1,000 new officers are hired, and baselines of coverage are established so as not to
canibalize the current safer parts of the city.

I support deploying more police officers in high-crime neighborhoods, but not at the expense of
so-called low crime neighborhoods. This can only be solved through the hiring of additional police
officers or the use of voluntary overtime.

YES

Joseph J. Moseley II IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

Yes

No,
we need to hire more police officers. Number one they are already working overtime which
causes lack of rest and lack in judgment. This would help to avoid volatile situations. The officers
should for the most part at least 40% should reflect the racial makeup of the community they
serve. Most importantly sensitivity training and restored justice practice to build relationships in
the community(this can build trust)

(****See Attached For Further Clarification****)

Michael E. LaFargue IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

YES

Michael E. LaFargue IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

The CAPs program could provide more information to communities. The meetings once per
month are not proving to be the best way to disseminate information. CAPs could establish an
email list by police district to share information much more quickly than waiting for the older
information provided once per month. There is a likelihood that if email alerts are shared
immediately when police are seeking assistance, a response may be forthcoming.
OTHER IDEAS
• Consider serving Food and Beverages at quarterly meetings. (Food Attracts People)
• Incentivizes the program my providing gifts for residents that attend meetings regularly. (IE
address numbers for garages, etc donated by a corporation.)
Both of the above ideas increase costs but may worth a try.

Responses vary depending on the neighborhood. We need more resources and better planning
to be able to respond appropriately in areas with more need or more affected by crime and
violence..

Carlos Ramirez-Rosa IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

No response provided

Yes, with the caveat that CPD crime figures do not always paint an accurate picture.

No

Susan Sadlowski Garza IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

candidate's responce

Yes, Staff must have more accountability in working with their districts.

no.

"No response provided"

Stephen Niketopoulos IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

N
We need more officers on the streets

yes

yes

Yes. But I would not support re-allocating police resources as a way to avoid hiring additional officers.

Yes

Yes. CAPS works well when you
have well trained facilitators who prioritize issues, set timelines for resolutions and CPD is
held accountable for the results