Is 911 response time adequate? If not, how can it be improved?

Public Safety

No, The men and women of our Chicago Police Department work hard to ensure a prompt
response to 911 response times. However, the police department itself is so short on
manpower that staffing levels have affected the response times, particularly during times
of heightened activity. To improve this, I am in favor of hiring additional police to maintain
safer staffing levels and improve quality.

yes

YES The 24th and 17th Districts are among the City’s very best and I do not receive a lot of complains regarding 911 response time. When the issue has come up, I have been able to discuss it directly with OEMC and our Police Commanders and I am satisfied with the responses I have received.

Yes, No response provided.

I do not have the data at this time. I know that in my community there was an issue regarding
911 and response time to a home invasion that left many here concerned. We had the 16th Dist.
Commander attend our next CAPS meeting to address these concerns and explain what
happened. Three items came from this event and the community’s response:
1) Dispatch call takers will go through re-training and appropriate questions to ask caller
2) Dispatch 911 call simultaneously when crime is occurring to district and allow the supervisor
to get available cars to scene
3) District Commanders work with Supervisors to monitor calls and dispatch where needed/
required

No. No response provided.

Chevette A. Valentine IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

No. Monitoring of calls, timing of calls to dispatch,
professionalism of operators who sometimes are a bigger problem that the incident to
which you call to report.

NO.
The most important improvement is to make sure that all communities are served equally by our
emergency services. A person in need in one part of the city shouldn’t have to wait longer for a
response to a life-threatening emergency than in another part of the city.

I do not have the data at this time. I know that in my community there was an issue regarding
911 and response time to a home invasion that left many here concerned. We had the 16th Dist.
Commander attend our next CAPS meeting to address these concerns and explain what
happened. Three items came from this event and the community’s response:
1) Dispatch call takers will go through re-training and appropriate questions to ask caller
2) Dispatch 911 call simultaneously when crime is occurring to district and allow the supervisor
to get available cars to scene
3) District Commanders work with Supervisors to monitor calls and dispatch where needed/
required
If not, how can it be improved?

Though I understand some communities have expressed
concern about 911 response time, I am generally satisfied with the 911 service in my community.
A few years ago, a political opponent attempted to make an issue out of the 911 service. A
community meeting was held that was attended by approximately 30 community residents. Only a
handful of people expressed any concerns about the 911 response.
I understand, however, that is not the case in other parts of the city. The Chicago Sun-Times
reported a few years ago that some emergency calls do not get responded to immediately
because there are simply not enough police officers on the street. That is not a 911 problem; it is
a staffing problem that can be addressed only through the hiring of more police officers or the use
of voluntary overtime

No. There are far to many RAPs (Radio Assignments Pending). As an example, you can find statistical data to support this claim for the 19th district here: http://www.cwbchicago.com/p/depleted­times­our­district­ran­out­of.html

In my Ward, we face several unique challenges. Because the crime rate in our community is lower than in other areas of the city, we have seen drastic reductions in police staffing levels. While it is understandable that certain areas need a heavier police presence than others, this has resulted in a noticeable increase in crime in our neighborhood. Violence has increased, evidenced by a shooting that occurred on the incumbent Alderman’s block just a few weeks ago. We’ve even seen an uptick in drugs in the community, though it’s not clear if that is an increase or simply that those who partake in the drug trade feel less of a need to conduct their trade in private.

Restoring police levels in both the 18th and 19th District will increase the police’s ability to cover all of their geography. Additionally, it will allow beat officers to get to know their neighbors much better to facilitate community policing.

Since we are unlikely to see an increase in police presence, despite our need to at least go back to previous staffing levels, it falls on the members of the community to take more of a role in improving public safety in our community. I have already been part of this effort, as I and many of my fellow community members have taken it upon ourselves to keep our Alderman and police informed of things that are happening in the Ward.

As Alderman, I will work to encourage public participation in this effort. I will be with my residents, on the street, dealing with their needs and concerns. Our Ward needs a visible and accessible Alderman who will put the needs of their residents above those of their political bosses and special interests.

No, See
Essay

Joseph J. Moseley II IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

No

It all depends I have seen 911 response very quickly, I have
also seen 911 response time not adequate at all,

No response provided

NO.My ward has one of the highest response times in the city; last year it was the highest. I’m
working with the concerned departments and personnel to reduce that time, and I am also
exploring the larger policy changes that need to be put into place, such as more police, resource
reallocation, etc. I should note that the 9th Ward also faces infrastructural issues related to
response time; specifically the large number of railroad tracks can be a factor, and so geographic
distribution of resources is also something we continue to examine.

Michael E. LaFargue IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

NO.Improvement could be obtained by increasing the police force to an adequate amount to
man/woman the city. In addition, numbers of police assigned to areas of the city should be based
upon the criminal activities.

No. It can be improved by process improvements for accepting calls, disbursing details and
dispatching the appropriate resources needs to be re-evaluated.

Michael E. LaFargue IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

NO.
Improvement could be obtained by increasing the police force to an adequate amount to
man/woman the city. In addition, numbers of police assigned to areas of the city should be based
upon the criminal activities

no. To ensure adequate police coverage and response time
across the city, I will advocate for the hiring of additional police officers spread across
all the police districts. I will also propose the hiring of retired police officers (at a
negotiated hourly rate) to perform routine administrative work within our districts, so
that our patrolman can get out of the police stations and into the neighborhoods where
they can do the most good.

Carlos Ramirez-Rosa IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

I support hiring 1,000 additional police officers.

NO.
87. and 88. 911 response is inadequate due to a decline in manpower, particularly in the Town Hall portion of the 43rd Ward. “RAPs” –radio assignments pending-- appear to be increasing, and we have to acknowledge that inadequate staffing is impacting safety. Rather than spending $100 million or more per year on overtime, we need to hire more police. Perhaps the Mayor will soften his position on this issue after the mugging of his son.

yes. I hear that it is adequate in the 21st ward

Open to ideas

Susan Sadlowski Garza IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

candidate's responce

No; Chicago needs to hire more police officers to improve public safety in our city. For three
years I have called for funding that allows the CPD to rely less on costly overtime and hire
and train additional officers. Currently overtime spending has increased to $100 million
annually. Investing in hiring 500 new police officers will reduce overtime costs and reduce
the burden on our current officers. The addition of new police officers will also allow us to
implement a neighborhood policing strategy that will make our communities safer.

No, We need to increase the amount of dispatchers and officers. Our officers are stretched to thin and we need to support them by increasing the amount of officers available to respond to calls.

Stephen Niketopoulos IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

N
More police need to be hired, about 2000 more

no

no.As a former police officer, I’ve seen first-hand the trauma crime and violence can bring
to a community. However, I also believe that we must balance this by introducing and
expanding programs that help our most vulnerable youth and prevent them from moving
toward crime

No. A big reason I am running in the 1st Ward is that the current alderman supported the closing of
two police stations in the ward. We have seen response times go up as a result. As a first step, I
would support reopening these two police stations.

No. CPD sets the priority calls, not OEMC. Police response time
in my community is not adequate. I do not hear overwhelming problems about CFD, so I
don’t think the problem is OEMC.