What is your assessment of Renaissance 2010 and its implementation in your ward as well as the City as a whole? Please include in your assessment the role of charter schools as well as the power to reconstitute schools.

Education

The Renaissance 2010 is designed to create high-performance educational institutions
throughout Chicago. These high performance schools are approved by the Chicago Public
School system, however they do not function under the same regulations as traditional
public schools in Chicago.
Ralph Ellison and the Chicago International Charter School – Wrightwood are two schools
associated with Renaissance 2010 and are located in the 18th ward. According to the
Chicago Public School website, over 71 percent of students are performing at or above the
state average at CICS-Wrightwood. However only 29 percent of students attending Ralph
Ellison meet or exceed state standards for testing.
Overall, the statistics for long-term effectiveness for Renaissance 2010 remain to be seen
due to the novelty of the program. I believe that the goal for high performance educational
institutions in Chicago is attainable and important and the 18th ward will be a beacon of
educational excellence in Chicago.

We do not have any charter schools in our Ward, so we were not impacted by Renaissance 2010. I think the charter school movement has been stopped in its tracks
and that is a good thing for the City. I do not think the City should close additional schools. Thankfully our Ward was spared from the type of changes that can damage a whole community.
I am on the record as supporting a moratorium on additional charter schools – in fact I have co-sponsored two resolutions in favor of moratoriums and, in doing so, broke very publicly from the Mayor. The reason for this decision was because charters schools are not unionized, they are subject to different standards, they are not as accountable as public schools. Additionally, there appears to be a pattern of impropriety and corruption among at least one charter school group, among other concerns.
Given the fact that the City has shuttered 50 public schools, it is inherently wrong to open additional for profit schools in the City.

Renaissance 2010 should be called Armageddon 2010. This is a
terrible program of the city in which they are attempting to get out of the public school business
while at the same time control the public schools. Whereas there have been some success stories
and I see value in “a few” charter schools, as a whole they perform below grade when it comes to
public schools. This and the fact that they work from a position of advantage since they can
remove challenged students or those with disciplinary issues. The 21st Ward has 11 charter
schools with one closed school and one in great disrepair. Neighborhood schools promote
community involvement. As it stands now, most of the resident children attend school outside the ward

There are some real misleading success stories in the charter school movement; I feel that
they deprive neighborhood schools of the students that have higher parental support.
What is being done is a redistribution and isolation of the higher supported student. I don’t
feel that removing the top percentile is the answer. I think identifying defined revenue
sources to properly fund and support CPS will provide for a real solution.

No response provided

The 43rd Ward has very successful public schools and they are implementing improvement plans. The 43rd Ward does not have any charter schools.

I support an increase in high-quality public education options such as selective
enrollment schools, STEM schools, International Baccalaureate schools, and highquality
Charter schools. Fixing our schools is at the core of creating good jobs, safer
streets, and brighter futures. Putting children first can no longer just be a tag line, it must
be a mindset used to address every issue. Renaissance 2010 was a start to a path to high
quality education, but needs adequate funding and oversight to ensure its success.

Unfortunately, the main thrust of this plan has been to open charter schools in lower income
neighborhoods which in turn took significant populations away from existing local public schools
which then “forced” CPS to close many of those schools. The priorities in this plan got lost or
mixed up along the way. Meant to foster innovation it instead became the latest devastation for
these neighborhoods. As alderman I would sponsor a Charter School Sunshine Act to require
all charters to fully disclose their use of public funding and would forbid them from diverting
money to their for-profit subsidiaries. Charters can have a role as laboratories for innovation,
but I am against the privatization of our public schools

Chevette A. Valentine IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

Please include in your assessment the role of charter schools as well as
the power to reconstitute schools.

The results of Renaissance 2010 have been mixed at best. Studies have shown that charter
schools generally have not outperformed neighborhood schools, at least not to a sufficient
degree to warrant the significant disruption to the school system as a whole. Nor has
reconstitution been proven particularly effective. Studies show that neighborhood schools with
strong Local School Councils that involved community members, parents, teachers, and
administrators working collaboratively improved even more than reconstituted schools.

Unfortunately, the main thrust of this plan has been to open charter schools in lower income
neighborhoods which in turn took significant populations away from existing local public schools
which then “forced” CPS to close many of those schools. The priorities in this plan got lost or
mixed up along the way. Meant to foster innovation it instead became the latest devastation for
these neighborhoods. As alderman I would sponsor a Charter School Sunshine Act to require
all charters to fully disclose their use of public funding and would forbid them from diverting
money to their for-profit subsidiaries. Charters can have a role as laboratories for innovation,
but I am against the privatization of our public schools.

I believe we need to examine more closely the
impact of Renaissance 2010, especially with respect to the reconstitution of schools. It certainly
seems to be a mixed bag. Some excellent schools seem to have emerged from the process, but
on balance, I believe this all-or-nothing approach may have done more harm than good. This is
why I have been very pleased to see the Board of Education adopt the 0S4 program. Unlike
a "school turnaround,' in which the entire school staff is replaced, the OS4 program keeps the
principal and staff in place. The program provides hands-on support for principals and teachers,
offering intense and comprehensive professional development tailored to the specific needs of the
school. In short, OS4 is a reasonable and balanced approach that addresses a school's serious
academic challenges, but falls short of firing the entire staff.
I advocated successfully for the implementation of the OS4 program at Gale School in my ward.
Gale is facing serious academic challenges, but it already has made progress, having been
recently reclassified from a Level 3 rating to a Level 2 rating.
I believe there is a place in our educational system for both quality neighborhood schools and
charter schools. The two charter schools in my neighborhood have offered the low income
families of my ward with a choice they did not previously have. Both schools are rated level 1 or
greater. Eighty-five percent of the graduates of the Chicago Math and Science Academy go on
to finish college and obtain a college degree. This is a remarkable statistic given that,
according to the Tribune, only eight percent of CPS high school freshmen obtain a college
degree. The vast majority of CMSA students are from low income families of color, most of whom
are the first people in their families to go to college. Shouldn’t these students have the same
opportunity to attend a quality school that the children from my middle and upper income families
enjoy? To me, it is a matter of simple justice.
Without a doubt, the existence of those charter schools has put additional competitive burdens on
the neighborhood schools in my ward. But the neighborhood schools have risen to the occasion.
As I noted above, all the schools in my ward, including the neighborhood schools, have increased
their school quality ratings despite the presence of charters
That being said, charter schools should be placed under a rigorous evaluation of the educational
quality they offer. I am pleased to see that CPS is no longer signing a “blank check” to new
charter schools and is closing those that are not performing.

No response provided

Joseph J. Moseley II IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

N/A

Please include in your assessment the role of charter schools as well as the
power to reconstitute schools.

Renaissance 2010 was in fact not as successful as initially expected. It is widely accepted that the increase in educational performance not achieved and it led to an increase in violence when closures and displacements occurred

Chicago Public Schools are moving in the right direction. In the 9th Ward, Gwendolyn Brooks
College Prep, where I am on the LSC, is one of the standout institutions in the system. Recently,
CPS recognized that fact: Brooks is to receive an Academic Center for 7th and 8th graders as
well as 200 more seats for high schoolers. The 9th Ward is also home to four level one
elementary schools and the Carver Military Academy, “the Jewel of the South Side.” These
schools are the lifeblood of their communities, and I hope to raise every school in my ward to their
level. Doing so will require significant investments of time, money, and personnel, in addition to
the involvement of parents and the community. In order to fund those investments, CPS needs to
work with the CTU to find efficiencies, craft a common-sense labor agreement, and ensure future
spending is focused on the most important priorities. And to me, what’s more important than
charter or not is a different question: are the students learning or not? The label is less important
than what’s happening inside the building. Every community needs a good neighborhood school.
That’s the bottom line.

Let’s be clear that I am adamantly against any privatization scheme that would turn over any part of our public school system to private corporations. I would advocate for a moratorium on any further opening of charter schools.

In general, I think we need to divert our energy and money into our
Chicago Public Schools. The charter school movement in the city and my ward has not proven
itself to be the “answer” to our public school system’s issues. Most studies show that charter
schools perform on par and in many cases underperform when compared to CPS. Also, the
notion that teachers and other workers not have union protections and get paid far less than their
CPS counterparts does not sit well with me. Also, given recent controversies related to funding
and how money is spent, such as those related to UNO further proves the need for more oversight, transparency and accountability

Michael E. LaFargue IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

The results of Renaissance 2010 has been abysmal, at best. The gap between school
accomplishment based upon the pyramid classifications, has widened 1.e. magnet, selective
enrollment, There is no accountability in any of the school initiatives and school performance
measures for the level of school as well as student being instructed. In recent studies, it has been
proven that the achievement of charter schools is, in many cases, poorer than some of the
general public schools. The restructure of schools in the “turn around” category haa not led to
better results. The only benefit to reconstitution of the schools have been in the case
Juan Perez, Jr. reported in the Chicago Tribune Charter schools have failed to improve
Chicago's public school system and perform less ably than comparable traditional schools,
according to a new report from an urban research group at the University of Minnesota Law
School.
The Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity concludes in its report that, taking into consideration
factors such as economic status, Chicago charters lag behind neighborhood schools in producing
students who meet or exceed standards for reading and math, as well as in graduation rates.
The institute also says its research found that "charters are much less likely to be racially or
ethnically diverse."……

No response provided

There is no substitute for neighborhood schools I believe that the Charter Schools that have been
developed in my ward have taken assets and public dollars away from the public schools and
have been incorrectly utilized to benefit private investors as oppose to the children which are the
primary focus. I believe that if the programs and monies were initially invested in the public
schools instead of building new charter schools both public schools and children would have
benefited as oppose of being divided and causing layoffs.

Renaissance 2010 is at the root of the most serious problems in our school system, including the
closing of public school and the proliferation of charters. The real purpose of this program was to
make it easier for districts to start their process of privatizing school and further segregate
students and communities. The emphasis on standardized testing must also end in order to
teach kids to learn.

This question will require further research and consideration.

Michael E. LaFargue IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

The results of Renaissance 2010 has been abysmal, at best. The gap between school
accomplishment based upon the pyramid classifications, has widened 1.e. magnet, selective
enrollment, There is no accountability in any of the school initiatives and school performance.
measures for the level of school as well as student being instructed. In recent studies, it has been
proven that the achievement of charter schools is, in many cases, poorer than some of the
general public schools. The restructure of schools in the “turn around” category haa not led to
better results. The only benefit to reconstitution of the schools have been in the case
Juan Perez, Jr. reported in the Chicago Tribune Charter schools have failed to improve
Chicago's public school system and perform less ably than comparable traditional schools,
according to a new report from an urban research group at the University of Minnesota Law
School.
The Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity concludes in its report that, taking into consideration
factors such as economic status, Chicago charters lag behind neighborhood schools in producing
students who meet or exceed standards for reading and math, as well as in graduation rates.
The institute also says its research found that "charters are much less likely to be racially or
ethnically diverse."……

No response provided

Carlos Ramirez-Rosa IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

I was opposed to the so-called “Renaissance 2010.” Instead of subjecting our children to school closures, “turnarounds,” and other education reform schemes that treat our children like widgets and public schools like a for-profit venture, I believe we should implement the best practices pioneered by the world’s most successful public school systems. I believe charter schools have failed to improve education outcomes and are too mired
in pay-to-play politics to address the real issues our schools face.

We do not have Renaissance 2010 Schools in the 43rd Ward, nor do we have charter schools in the 43rd Ward, so these issues are not burning in our ward. The Renaissance 2010 program was the beginning of the choice movement in Chicago Public Schools, which has had mixed results.

No response provided

No response provided

I personally believe in community schools vs charter schools. Charter schools while some may
be good, seem to be plagued with the typical corruption of most privatization measures in
Chicago.

Susan Sadlowski Garza IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

candidate's responce

Chicago has turned its back on neighborhood schools and our children and communities
are paying the price. Rather than using city resources to support public schools and
alleviate overcrowding, those resources have been diverted to charter schools that have
failed to demonstrate their superiority. In the meantime, students in neighborhood schools
are being left behind.
School reconstitution disrupts the educational experience of students and demonstrates a
lack of support for our teachers. We should, instead, be giving more support to our
schools and working to address the problems they face rather than using a blunt tool like
reconstitution

Renaissance 2010 didn’t include a clear strategy for improving neighborhood schools and has not
worked well for our neighborhood public schools. CPS needs to make many changes to improve
the charter school system. An independent authorizer should be hired to eliminate politics from
decisions on which operators get charters and where they locate. Charter schools should also be
required to comply with the state’s Freedom of Information Act. Many charters can’t make the
case that they deserve more public money if they aren’t forthcoming about how they’re spending
what they already get and how dependent they may be on foundations and wealthy individuals.
Charters also need to be upfront about the training, experience, and salary levels and of their
teaching staff and have evaluation measures similar to those of regular non-charter CPS
teachers.

I supported the Renaissance 2010 program. I believe that schools that are not meeting standards must be monitored and given guidance to make the appropriate changes necessary to educate our children. If a school should be closed students should have the first opportunity to attend the new charter school if one is available. Reconstituting a school should only happen if the schools fail to meet standards for 3 consecutive years. Before this happens we want to ensure everything possible was done to help the school succeed, we want to ensure that all education facilities are held accountable to meet the demands of quality education for our children.

Renaissance 2010 has destroyed the education fiber of my ward, and in the city, you now have kids from warring gang areas walking to school in dangerous communities thus adding to the increase to after school shootings in Chicago.
Charter schools is an ideology I am strongly opposed too, they do nothing but make
neighborhood schools weaker. I work tirelessly to make life for Charter schools horrible.

Stephen Niketopoulos IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

I don’t think they lived up to the hype, and when put side by side they are similar in test scores to CPS. I also think that teachers need to make more money at Charter schools. Charters teachers and staff should have the right to form a union.

No response provided

While this has not affected our ward, I do have concerns about the performance of Charter Schools. I refer to my answers regarding privatization as a benchmark for how we evaluate Charter Schools. They must perform more effectively and more efficiently than their public counterparts if they wish to see my support.

That said, I believe that having educational choice is a benefit to our community. While I take great pride in my family’s choice of public education and have committed to all that public education demands upon parents to be successful, I am cognizant of the fact that there is more than one way to educate children successfully. As a child and brother to two teachers, I learned to have an open mind to the variety of educational approaches. There are a variety of options for high quality schools in our neighborhood and there needs to be a variety across the city.

I am a champion for education and have been closely watching a variety of education
reform matters. I am certainly opposed to fraud or deals that defraud the taxpayers and
the children of the City.
I believe that charter schools can be an important mechanism for testing alternative
learning strategies. However, it is imperative that there be a balance with the opening of
new schools and the preservation of existing schools. Although the mission of
Renaissance 2010 was to create more high quality educational options across Chicago,
the opening of charter schools does not relieve the city of its ongoing responsibility to
support and enhance already existing schools.
I believe that there ought to be a more comprehensive method by which we carefully evaluate
the performance of the teachers and administrators in a troubled school district before making
such a drastic decision close or “turn around” a school, which I think works strongly to the
detriment of neighborhood schools. Whether through performance incentives or mandates, we
must be more deliberate in identifying those teachers who are not performing rather than
summarily firing everyone

No response provided

I favor different choices to meet different needs, as long as
they are not at the expense of public schools generations have depended upon in their
neighborhoods. I have observed several reasons why schools may need to be
reconstituted, with far too much blame put on teachers and administrations. I have worked
with ward schools to determine the true issues. I have successfully fought for what best
meets community needs, including saving programs about to be eliminated. We do not
have many charter schools. However, Comer College Prep and The Woodlawn School
provide high quality alternatives that were difficult to achieve as quickly or as tailored
through the bureaucracy of CPS.

Despite a few success stories, overall evidence suggests
R2010 has not yielded dramatic results. Classrooms should be assigned highly qualified,
state certified teachers. More emphasis should be placed on solving problems of existing
schools, rather than creating new ones or reconstituting existing ones