What procedures will you implement to ensure that privatization arrangements are not being used to move patronage workers outside of the scope of the Rutan decision requirements or any other anti-patronage rules or protocols?

Corruption

I would fully support any ordinance that would guarantee that the City of Chicago acts in
full compliance with the Shakman decree.

Again, I completely oppose the privatization of public assets.We are very inclusive in all planning and development projects, small, big and in between. Using Devon Avenue as an example, we have hosted nearly a dozen community meetings and more involving business owners. Residents and business owners were an important
part of the decision making process, from where to install street furniture to how and when the project should start and finish. I brought in department heads from the City of Chicago, as well as the Mayor, so residents could speak with them directly about the scope and impact of the project. Our Special Service Area members and Chamber of Commerce were involved as well. All stakeholders continue to be a part of the redevelopment of this critical business district.
It is only fair that the people who are impacted by planning and development are heard when it comes to various projects and, more that just heard, their voices affect and dictate the outcomes of these meetings. All zoning changes in the 50th Ward require a community meeting.

There are two things that I would
include into any contract should the city ever pursue future privatization contracts: 1. An opt out
clause should the city find out some where down the line that the agreement overwhelmingly was
adverse to the public good and 2. A windfall profit clause return the city excess profits in any deal

I support transparency in privatization and hiring. What I suggest is requiring a list of all
relevant individuals responsible for the deal, similar to a statement of economic interest.
This will shine light on the people involved in any privatization deal.

No response provided

I believe ethics statements incorporated into privatization contracts will provide a foundation for
procedures to ensure that privatization arrangements are not being used to move patronage
workers. This measure is made in addition to other safeguards the council may create.

I would co-sponsor an ordinance prohibiting the above from happening.

Chevette A. Valentine IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

A comprehensive study of previous projects, a thorough
review of their records of success and failures, track record examination of previous
projects.

I would fight for procedures that provide transparency into the private company’s management
and hiring, so that we avoid deals with entities based on patronage.

I would co-sponsor an ordinance prohibiting the above from happening.

The same criteria for City hiring
under Rutan should be applied to any private contractor who provides city services.

No response provided

No response provided

Joseph J. Moseley II IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

N/A

I would seek a moratorium on the sell/privatization of city assets (i.e. parking meters, airports, skyway, etc.)

See my statement above. Any current arrangements need to be unwound.

Let me say again, I do not support privatization of our city

Michael E. LaFargue IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

In contract language for all private contractors, I would support a statement be required that the
hiring of any individusls in a position under the contract must meet the same requirements and/or
restrictions as an individual being hired by the City. The contractor would provide the names,
titles and identifying information of the hirees on a quarterly basis for review by city personnel
departments.

My office will abide to the rules and regulations of the Board of
Ethics and the Investigative General’s Office, and I will implement my good government and
transparency policy to ensure that these arrangements do not come to fruition

Not sure what specific measures should be taken. I will
work to ensure that such maneuvers are not successful

No response provided

I would need to put together a strategic plan to make sure that arrangements are not tools used to
work outside of the system.

Michael E. LaFargue IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

In contract language for all private contractors, I would support a statement be required that the
hiring of any individusls in a position under the contract must meet the same requirements and/or
restrictions as an individual being hired by the City. The contractor would provide the names,
titles and identifying information of the hirees on a quarterly basis for review by city personnel
departments

I would depend on the decision of an independent review board, review their conclusions and
possibly demand a second opinion before voting on privatization

I’ve explained this earlier

Carlos Ramirez-Rosa IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

I support a city ordinance that would require city contractors to implement anti-patronage rules, and that would prohibit political
contributions from potential or recent city contractors.

One of the problems of privatization is that the private companies no longer fall under the umbrella of anti-patronage laws, although there are still laws that prevent city employees from instructing city contractors to hire certain people. The problem is that there is no oversight of this law (it’s mostly self-policed) and there are few, if any, consequences for violations. I would mandate that no current City employee, elected official or family member of a City official is eligible for newly privatized jobs for the first five years following privatization. Lastly, I would mandate full disclosure of employee names in privatized jobs and of the salary of those in executive positions.

No response provided

First and foremost, I would resist this move toward privatization, then we must have a very honest
and open conversation that calls this move toward privatization for what it is in many instances,
an attempt to circumvent the current law

If privatization is used appropriately and it’s a good deal for the city, I think the private company
can hire whomever they want.

Susan Sadlowski Garza IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

candidate's responce

I support efforts to establish stronger oversight of any proposed privatization deal that include independent impact studies and public hearings to ensure that any deals do not
come at the expense of service quality for city residents and to ensure that all antipatronage
rules and protocols are followed.

Hire employment "monitors" proactively looking for hiring violations and substantially
increase Rutan penalties.

I will always vote no on privatizing.

If a municipal employee is qualified, then they should be able to apply for available positions. Everyone deserves a fair opportunity and it is important to allow for fair application processes.

Stephen Niketopoulos IVI-IPO 2015 Chicago City Council

By having an open and transparent dialogue about these arrangements, with
independent eyes keeping the process accountable.

See above.

Full disclosure of all personal affliliations of current and
personal businesses.

The City’s inspector general is tasked with investigating the performance of government
officers, employees, functions and programs. I encourage and will continue to support
their efforts to detect and prevent misconduct, inefficiency and waste within the
programs and operations of city government.

No privatization agreement should circumvent Rutan or any other patronage laws. I would oppose such a privatization agreement.

Any contract that replaces large numbers of current city employees should have protections for
the current employees, such as a hiring guarantee by the new contractor.

I am a co-sponsor of Privatization Transparency and Accountability
Ordinance, which establishes a process to provide for public input and City Council review
of any proposed City privatization plans. I achieved a national reputation for my stand on
stronger oversight, more transparency and thorough advance cost-benefit analysis
regarding privatization of city assets. I was one of a handful of aldermen to oppose the
Midway Airport and parking meter deals precisely because of the flawed process. I also
opposed the red-light cameras. As noted above, I even favor the revisiting of several
hurried privatization transactions on both legal and benefit grounds.
In addition, these deals should have monitoring
and enforcement components to be considered for approval.

The inspector general should be able to conduct random
audits on the hiring practices of these firms. Significant fines should be outlined in an
ordinance covering companies found to be hiring based on politics.